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Cops break up ‘large gathering’ at Orthodox synagogue in Brooklyn – New York Post

| May 21, 2020

The NYPD broke up a gathering of about 100 people at a Brooklyn synagogue Wednesday morning while responding to a 311 complaint, police and the mayors office said. The officers responded to a call shortly before 8 a.m. at the Congregation Yetev Lev Satmar Ohel Feiga on South 8th Street near Bedford Avenue and found the gathering, according to cops.

Joy, fear and sorrow mix for Italian Jews returning to synagogue J. – The Jewish News of Northern California

| May 21, 2020

The tables were still covered with open copies of the Book of Esther when Rabbi Yigal Chazan reentered his Milan synagogue this week. The scripture is read during Purim, the Jewish holiday that took place more than two months ago

After months of enforced distancing, worshipers return to Jerusalem’s synagogues – Haaretz

| May 21, 2020

Anyone entering the Shtiblach Katamon synagogue on Hahish Street in Jerusalem gets a strange feeling. The dust on the benches is heartbreaking. The clocks on the walls, which are an hour behind because there was nobody to switch them to summer time, added to the depressing atmosphere.

Conn. Reopens, and Some Worship to Resume in N.Y. – The New York Times

| May 21, 2020

Reopening begins in Connecticut. Connecticut, which has been less affected by the coronavirus than neighboring New York, took the biggest step toward restarting its dormant economy on Wednesday, allowing restaurants, stores and malls to reopen, with significant limits.

Prayer with masks and no singing returns to synagogues in Italy, Germany – The Jerusalem Post

| May 21, 2020

As life in Europe ground to a shuddering halt when the COVID-19 pandemic struck, so too did religious life, including communal prayer, study and celebrations for Jewish communities across the continent.But, with several countries opening back up after a steep reduction in the number of daily COVID-19 cases, communities in Italy and Germany are now able to return to their synagogues and some semblance of communal life is restarting.Synagogues in Italy, one of the hardest-hit countries in the world, opened again on Monday, albeit with strict government restrictions for how to operate, while synagogues in some German cities have been open since the beginning of May with similar restrictions.In Rome, morning prayers on Monday in the citys great synagogue were attended by some 80 worshipers, its maximum capacity under the current regulations, while several other synagogues in the city also opened their doors.Others were forced to remain outside due to the restrictions on the number of people allowed in the synagogue, which in normal times can house hundreds of worshipers.Worshipers must wear masks, and singing any of the prayers is banned for the general congregation since it increases the range of spittle emitted during prayers, although the individual leading the prayers can sing since he is isolated on the prayer platform.This means that a central feature of the Shabbat prayer services, the choir, will also be banned for now.It was very moving to start back prayers, and we even had a Bar Mitzvah Monday morning, although those who couldnt be accommodated were obviously disappointed, said Rabbi Shmuel Di Segni, Chief Rabbi of Rome.He said the prohibition on singing reduced the atmosphere in the synagogue, but conceded it was better than nothing.The upcoming Shavuot holiday will be impacted by more than just restrictions on the number of worshipers, but also by the fact that communal meals over the holidays, a common feature of Jewish life in the country, will not be allowed.Di Segni said that the synagogue is considering forming extra, outdoor prayer services in order to cater to the large number of people expected to attend the Shavuot prayers.The rabbi said that while the mood in the community has been lifted somewhat by the reopening of the synagogues, congregants are still nevertheless concerned about their economic situation.Store owners and those involved in the tourism industry have been hard hit by the pandemic, and there does not appear to be a quick return to business as usual for.In Frankfurt, Germany, the Jewish community has been able to pray since the beginning of May, but only in the great synagogue, and not the citys three other synagogues.The grand synagogue can usually hold up to 1,000 worshipers, but due to the necessity of staying 1.5m.

Synagogues wary of reopening too soonFree Access – Jewish Advocate

| May 21, 2020

BOSTON Despite the inclusion of houses of worship in Phase 1 of Gov.

Israeli synagogues reopen with requirement that ‘corona official’ enforces the rules – Cleveland Jewish News

| May 21, 2020

JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli synagogues reopened on Wednesday morning, two months after being ordered closed to prevent the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. The joint announcement from the Health Ministry and the Prime Ministers Office came late Tuesday evening and following pressure brought to bear by Israels chief rabbi and other religious officials.

Govt allows synagogues to open with limit of 50 worshipers – The Jerusalem Post

| May 21, 2020

The government approved the reopening of synagogues following the COVID-19 shutdown Tuesday night, dependent on several restrictions. Up to 50 people will be allowed in one prayer hall, and they will need to ensure a space of two meters between worshipers, wear a mask and be stringent about hygiene standards

Olive trees planted in memory of Poway Synagogue shooting victim – The Jerusalem Post

| May 21, 2020

It has been over a year since the Chabad of Poway synagogue shooting, which took place during Shabbat morning services on Passover. Today, Chabad of Poway synagogue members may find some solace in knowing that a ceremony has taken place in Southern Israel in memory of one of the victims of the attack in order to perpetuate her memory.On Monday, 25 olive trees were planted at a ceremony in southern Israel in memory of Lori Gilbert-Kaye, who was tragically shot and killed in the antisemitic attack at the Synagogue in California. The ceremony took place at Kfar Silver Youth Village, a part of the World ORT Kadima Mada school network, where local children helped to plant the trees

The Whole World Is Sitting Shiva – The Atlantic

| May 21, 2020

Sarah Davis survived the Holocaust.


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