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Is it Permissible to Study Mishneh Torah as a Stand-Alone Work? – Mishneh Torah In-Depth, Article 1 – Introduction to Mishneh Torah – Chabad.org

| July 4, 2020

The Talmud in Tractate Sotah, asinterpreted by Rashi, makes a startling statement: It was stated, one who readScripture and studied Mishnah, but did not serve Torah sages, he didnot spend time amongst the scholars in order to decipher the reasoning behindthe commandments.

A treasure trove of LGBTQ texts from two millennia of Jewish history – The Jewish News of Northern California

| July 4, 2020

A year before Noam Sienna, 30, earned his Ph.D. in Jewish history at the University of Minnesota last month, he had already published a groundbreaking book. A Rainbow Thread: An Anthology of Queer Jewish Texts from the First Century to 1969 collects primary sources by and about queer Jews dating back much further than most people would have thought possible.

Why the Menorah Is the Most Enduring of All Jewish Symbols – Flux Magazine

| July 4, 2020

words Alexa Wang Like other cultures and faiths, Jewish people have developed a rich religious and cultural heritage before four thousand years ago. All the cultures have their own significant symbols and Judaism has too, such as a tallit, tefillin, kippah, seder plate, kiddush cup, Shabbat candles, etc.

The broad wall, 17 Tammuz and a time to play – The Jewish Star

| July 4, 2020

By Rabbi Binny Freedman Next week we commemorate the breaching of the Old City walls of Jerusalem by the Roman Tenth Legion on the 17th day of Tammuz in 70 CE, heralding the beginning of the end of the Jewish Second Commonwealth and the destruction of the Beit HaMikdash. As we gaze upon the ruins of those walls, we will fast, and some of us will cry, remembering how 2,000 years ago, peaceful streets were filled with the triumphant cheers of Roman legionnaires bent on our destruction. But there is another wall in Jerusalem that is worth thinking about, and that wall pre-dates the Roman destruction by almost 1,000 years.

I speak for the tribe who followed Carl Reiner – Forward

| July 4, 2020

When I was growing up on Long Island, our house had a living room with orange-fabric couches (it was the 70s after all) and an upright piano flanked by two dark brown wood cabinets. On one side was a bar where my dad would have a Gin & Tonic (with a Stella Doro breadstick) every night when he got home from his orthodontic practice in Queens.

When King Louis IX Burned the Talmud – Aish

| July 1, 2020

A thousand years ago, King Louis IX ordered the Talmud burned in Paris. O (Talmud), that has been consumed by fire, seek the welfare of those who mourn for you These searing words were written by Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg (1215-1293), a brilliant Jewish student whod recently travelled from his home in northern Germany to Paris to study a renown yeshiva there, after he witnessed the mass burning of the Talmud in Paris in 1240 on the orders of King Louis IX. A peripatetic king, Louis IX was one of the few Medieval Christian thinkers to willingly engage in debate with Jews - but his legacy is one of pain and suffering for thousands of Jews in France.

Why Isn’t Poultry and Dairy Kosher? – Kosher – Chabad.org

| July 1, 2020

This prohibition of separating milk and meat is derived from the verse "Do not cook a kid (gedi) in its mother's milk, which is repeated three times in the Torah. The sages explain that the repetition of the verse teaches us that not only is one forbidden to cook meat and milk together, but one is also forbidden to eat or derive benefit from such a mixture.

St. Louis’s statue of Pius XII: A double-standard – The Times of Israel

| July 1, 2020

Over the past several days, the campaign to rid the city of St. Louis of the statue of its namesake (Louis IX, King of France, 1226-70) has gathered steam.

Where There’s a Will There’s a Why – TAPinto.net

| July 1, 2020

Why do certain people find satisfaction in Judaism while others are bored stiff?

The Three Weeks & the Nine Days – The Jewish Voice

| July 1, 2020

By: Rabbi Shraga Simmons The Three Weeks between the 17th of Tammuz and the Tisha BAv have historically been days of misfortune and calamity for the Jewish people. During this time, both the First and Second Temples were destroyed, amongst other terrible tragedies.


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