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Jewish Clothing | My Jewish Learning

| March 16, 2019

Clothing has long played a significant role in Judaism,reflecting religious identification, social status, emotional state and even the Jews relation with the outside world. The ancient rabbis taught that maintaining their distinctive dress in Egypt was one of the reasons the Jews were worthy of being rescued from servitude. During synagogue services, Jewish men traditionally don prayer shawls and cover their heads with kippot, practices that some liberal Jewishwomen have adopted as well

Tzadik – Wikipedia

| February 18, 2019

Tzadik ((Hebrew: [tsadik], "righteous [one]", also zadik, addq or sadiq; pl. tzadikim [tsadikim] adiqim) is a title in Judaism given to people considered righteous, such as Biblical figures and later spiritual masters.

Neo-Hasidism – Wikipedia

| February 11, 2019

Neo-Hasidism is a name given to contemporary Jewish trends of a significant fusing or revival of interest in the teachings of Kabbalah and Hasidism by members of other existing Jewish movements. Among non-Orthodox Jews, this trend stems from the writings of non-Orthodox teachers of Hasidic Judaism like Martin Buber, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Lawrence Kushner, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi and Arthur Green.[1] This is usually associated with the members of the Jewish Renewal movement. A second form of this trend is found within the Modern Orthodox Jewish community, and is referred to as Neo-Chassidus, involving those who are Modern Orthodox but have taken interest in the works of Hasidic masters.[2] Martin Buber helped initiate interest in Hasidism among modernized Jews through a series of books he wrote in the first decades of the 20th century, such as Tales of the Hasidic Masters and the Legend of the Baal Shem Tov

Hasidim And Mitnagdim – Jewish Virtual Library

| February 2, 2019

Although contemporary Jews often use the word "Hasid" as a synonym for ultra-Orthodox, Hasidism, a religious movement that arose in eighteenth century Eastern Europe, was originally regarded as revolutionary and religiously liberal. Its opponents, known as Mitnagdim, were themselves Orthodox Jews. More than any thing else, the stories that each group told about its rabbinic leaders exemplify the differences among them.

YIVO | Ger Hasidic Dynasty

| February 2, 2019

The Ger dynasty (also Gur), named for the town of Gra Kalwaria in the Warsaw district, had the largest following of any Hasidic group in central Poland until the Holocaust andto a large degree dominated Jewish religious life in the area around Warsaw for some 80 years.

In Crown Heights, Hasidic Graffiti Artists Are Pushing The …

| January 26, 2019

If you walk by Primo Hatters mens hat shop on Kingston Avenue in the heart of Crown Heights, you might just miss it.

Hasidic Anti-Vaxxers Reject Rebbes Pro-Vaccine Rulings The …

| January 26, 2019

Minke used to get her kids vaccinated, though she never felt right about it.

Hasidic Jewish Rules – Ultra Orthodox Beliefs & Practices

| December 26, 2018

The rules and lifestyle of Hasidic Jews seem mysterious.

Chabad – Wikipedia

| November 11, 2018

Chabad, also known as Lubavitch, Habad and Chabad-Lubavitch[1] (Hebrew: "), is an Orthodox Jewish, Hasidic movement. Chabad is one of the world's best known Hasidic movements, particularly for its outreach. It is one of the largest Hasidic groups[2][3][4] and Jewish religious organizations in the world.[5][6] Founded in 1775 by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, the name "Chabad" () is a Hebrew acronym for Chochmah, Binah, Da'at (, , ): "Wisdom, Understanding, and Knowledge", which represent the intellectual underpinnings of the movement.[7][8] The name Lubavitch is the Yiddish name of the PolishLithuanian Commonwealth village Lubowicze (Lyubavichi) now in Russia, where the movements leaders lived for over 100years

Breslov (Hasidic group) – Wikipedia

| October 30, 2018

Breslov (also Bratslav, also spelled Breslev) is a branch of Hasidic Judaism founded by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov (17721810), a great-grandson of the Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism. Its adherents strive to develop an intense, joyous relationship with God and receive guidance toward this goal from the teachings of Rebbe Nachman.


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