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Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 13

Posted By on October 13, 2012

TODAY

BATESBURG BUSINESS ASSOCIATION FALL FESTIVAL: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. today, downtown Batesburg. Chili cook-off, scarecrow contest, antique tractor display, childrens activities, live music, vendors and more. (803) 730-5478

WALK AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: 9 a.m. today at Finlay Park, 930 Laurel St. Free; information fair will be held before and after the walk. Late registration at 8 a.m. http://www.columbiasc.net

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS WALK: 9 a.m.-noon today at Caughman Road Park, 2800 Trotter Road, Hopkins. T-shirts, $10. Sponsored by the Richland County Recreation Commission, proceeds will benefit the Palmetto Health Foundation. (803) 738-0400

FALL HERITAGE FESTIVAL AND PICKIN PARTY: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today at the State Museum, 301 Gervais St. Barbecue (chicken and three styles of pork), music, entertainment, antique tractor parade and craft demonstrations. Chicken plates, $10; pork sampler plates, $10; plate with one style of cue, $7; sandwiches and chips, $5. (803) 898-4952; http://www.southcarolinastatemuseum.org

STILL STANDING SURVIVORS LUNCHEON: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. today at the Brookland Baptist Banquet and Conference Center, 1066 Sunset Blvd., West Columbia. Guest speaker will be Deadra Malloy, project coordinator for P.O.S.I.T.I.V.E. Voices. Sponsored by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Upsilon Omega Omega Chapter, the event is in support of HIV/AIDS, cancer and domestic violence survivors. $40; a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the SC HIV/AIDS Council. http://www.akairmo.org/stillstanding.html

LATINOS Y MAS! FESTIVAL: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. today at North Springs Park, 1320 Clemson Road. Family friendly multicultural celebration will feature childrens activities, arts and crafts, DJ, international foods, fashion and demonstrations. (803) 736-6070 or (803) 231-1142

INCARNATION LUTHERAN CHURCH OKTOBERFEST: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. today at Incarnation Lutheran Church, 3005 Devine St. German food, beer, dancers, music, childrens activities and more. Proceeds will benefit Harvest Hope Food Bank, Midlands Council for Foster Children and the Incarnation Lutheran Church Foundation. (803) 256-2381

LAKE CAROLINA WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL: 2-5 p.m. today at Lake Carolinas Village Green. Proceeds will benefit Childrens Charities of the Midlands. Advance tickets, $30; age 12 and younger, $15; at the door, $35/$20. (803) 561-0915; http://www.lakecarolinawineandfood.com

OKTOBERFEST ON MAIN: 5 p.m. today, downtown Sumter. Live music, German food and beer. Advance tickets, $10; $15 at the door. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Sumter County Gallery of Art. (803) 436-2640; http://www.oktoberfestsumter.com

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Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 13

Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 12

Posted By on October 12, 2012

TODAY

MAYORS CAMPAIGN AGAINST BREAST CANCER ISABEL LAW BREAKFAST: 6-9 a.m. today in the Columbia City Hall parking lot, 1737 Main St. On the menu: bacon, eggs, sausage, liver pudding, hash browns, grits, pancakes, biscuits, coffee and juice; $7. Proceeds will benefit Bosom Buddies, an organization that assists women in need of mastectomy camisoles or other post-surgical needs.

INCARNATION LUTHERAN CHURCH OKTOBERFEST: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. today, Saturday and noon-7:30 p.m. Sunday at Incarnation Lutheran Church, 3005 Devine St. German food, beer, dancers, music, childrens activities and more. Proceeds will benefit Harvest Hope Food Bank, Midlands Council for Foster Children and the Incarnation Lutheran Church Foundation. (803) 256-2381

FALL FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. today at Polo Road Park, 730 Polo Road. Games, candy, food and fun for all ages; free. Bring a non-perishable food item to be donated to Harvest Hope Food Bank. (803) 736-1657

CAROLINA SPRINGS ELEMENTARY FALL CARNIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Friday at Carolina Springs Elementary School, 6180 Platt Springs Road, Lexington. Carnival games, bounce house, face painting, food, silent auction. Free; all-play wristbands, $8; $15 at the door. (803) 821-5100

NEW PROVIDENCE ELEMENTARY FALL FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Friday at New Providence Elementary School, 1118 Old Cherokee Road, Lexington. Inflatable rides, games, prizes, costume contest, laser tag and a pumpkin patch. $10 in advance; $12 at the door; family of three, $25. (803) 821-3300

HAPPY HOUR HISTORY TOURS OF THE VISTA: 5:30 p.m. today, meet next to Gervais & Vine, 620 Gervais St. Guided walking tours include cocktail and appetizer stops along the way. $25; Historic Columbia Foundation members, $20. Reservations encouraged. (803) 252-1770, ext. 24 or email reservations@historiccolumbia.org

FALL CONCERT SERIES: 7 p.m. Fridays through Nov. 9, Town Center Common, Village at Sandhill, Clemson and Two Notch Roads. Free concert series kicks off tonight with R&B, soul and Motown sounds from Fantasy. http://www.villageatsandhill.com

CAYCE-WEST COLUMBIA JAYCEES HALL OF HORRORS: Fridays-Sundays through Oct. 28 and Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 1153 Walter Price St., Cayce. Hours are 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 6:30 p.m. Sundays and 7 p.m. Oct. 31. $13; RIP (skip the line), $20; Sundays, $10-$15. Proceeds benefit local and state charities. http://www.hallofhorrors.com

SATURDAY

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Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 12

‘Oil

Posted By on October 11, 2012

11-10-2012 09:34 RT's Gayane Chichakyan talks to John Esposito, former consultant to US state department, discussing America's current foreign policy. RT LIVE Subscribe to RT! Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Google+ RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios

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'Oil

Champlin-Dayton Calendar

Posted By on October 11, 2012

So Kiss Me Already, Herschel Gertz!

OCT. 12 & 13 Northern Intercultural Spiritual Experiences, of Champlin, along with a grant from Metropolitan Regional Arts Council presents, So Kiss Me Already, Herschel Gertz! a new solo show by Minneapolis actor/writer Amy Salloway. The show is based loosely on her own adolescent experience of being forcibly shipped off by her parents to a very observant Jewish summer camp. Recommended for audiences ages 13 and older. Showtime both evenings is 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 for general seating and $25 for reserved. Appearing at Champlin United Methodist Church, 921 Downs Road. Info: Sally at 763-421-5166 or mnnise@gmail.com.

Dracula

OCT. 12 28 Dracula opens Oct.12 and runs through Oct. 28 at Lyric Arts Main Street Stage, 420 East Main Street, Anoka. Tickets for the production and reservations can be made by calling the box office at 763-422-1838 or by visiting the Lyric Arts website at http://www.lyricarts.org.

Word of Peace festival

OCT. 12 The Word of Peace Church Fall is Friday, Oct. 12, from noon to 8 p.m. Featuring games, prizes and food. NEW this year: Peace Pumpkin Patch and special hours (noon to 4 p.m.) for kids 5 and under.

HC vehicle auction

OCT. 13 Hennepin County Purchasing and Contract Services and partnering municipalities are hosting a vehicle auction Saturday, Oct. 13, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Manheim Minneapolis location at 8001 Jefferson Highway in Maple Grove. Registration for bidders is from 8 to 10 a.m. Specifics about the auction are available at http://www.manheim.com.

Autumn Woods Classic

OCT. 13 The Annual Autumn Wood Classic takes place Saturday, Oct. 13, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Elm Creek Park Reserve in Maple Grove. The Classic features a 10K run, 5K run/walk and 1K kids run. Team 5K and 10K categories are also available. Family activities include musical entertainment, climbing wall, kids obstacle course, crafts and displays. Cost for the 10K and 5K races is $29 for day-of registration and just $23 for pre-registration. Cost for the 1K kids run is $9 day-of and just $5 for pre-registration. The pre-registration deadline is Oct. 8. For more information visit http://www.ThreeRiversParks.org or call 763-559-6700. Volunteers also are needed, call 763-559-6706.

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Champlin-Dayton Calendar

Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 11

Posted By on October 11, 2012

TODAY

LUNCH AND LEARN: 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. today at the Capital Senior Center, 1650 Park Circle (Maxcy Gregg Park). Sandy Knowles, from the State Librarys Talking Book Services, will speak on resources for seniors and those with disabilities such as visual difficulties. Free; RSVP at info@capitalseniorcenter.com.

HISTORIC HAUNTINGS: 6-8:30 tonight at Elmwood Cemetery. Historic Columbia Foundation guides will offer 30-minute tours, childrens crafts, snacks and Halloween-related activities. $10; children, $5; HCF members, $5/$3. http://cemeterytours.eventbrite.com

FRIDAY

MAYORS CAMPAIGN AGAINST BREAST CANCER ISABEL LAW BREAKFAST: 6-9 a.m. Friday in the Columbia City Hall parking lot, 1737 Main St. On the menu: bacon, eggs, sausage, liver pudding, hash browns, grits, pancakes, biscuits, coffee and juice. $7; advance tickets available at City Hall; Public Works, 2910 Colonial Drive; Washington Square, 1136 Washington St. Pre-orders deadline is noon today; call (803) 545-3800 or email lrmcvean@columbiasc.net. Proceeds will benefit Bosom Buddies, an organization that assists women in need of mastectomy camisoles or other post-surgical needs.

INCARNATION LUTHERAN CHURCH OKTOBERFEST: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday, Saturday and noon-7:30 p.m. Sunday at Incarnation Lutheran Church, 3005 Devine St. German food, beer, dancers, music, childrens activities and more. Proceeds will benefit Harvest Hope Food Bank, Midlands Council for Foster Children and the Incarnation Lutheran Church Foundation. (803) 256-2381

FALL FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Friday at Polo Road Park, 730 Polo Road. Games, candy, food and fun for all ages; free. Bring a non-perishable food item to be donated to Harvest Hope Food Bank. (803) 736-1657

CAROLINA SPRINGS ELEMENTARY FALL CARNIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Friday at Carolina Springs Elementary School, 6180 Platt Springs Road, Lexington. Carnival games, bounce house, face painting, food, silent auction. Free; all-play wristbands, $8; $15 at the door. (803) 821-5100

NEW PROVIDENCE ELEMENTARY FALL FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. Friday at New Providence Elementary School, 1118 Old Cherokee Road, Lexington. Inflatable rides, games, prizes, costume contest, laser tag and a pumpkin patch. $10 in advance; $12 at the door; family of three, $25. (803) 821-3300

HAPPY HOUR HISTORY TOURS OF THE VISTA: 5:30 p.m. Friday, meet next to Gervais & Vine, 620 Gervais St. Guided walking tours include cocktail and appetizer stops along the way. $25; Historic Columbia Foundation members, $20. Reservations encouraged. (803) 252-1770, ext. 24 or email reservations@historiccolumbia.org

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Community calendar for the Midlands, Oct. 11

Record

Posted By on October 10, 2012

Autumn bird walks slated

Tomorrow, Oct. 13, and Oct. 20 and 27, at 7:30 a.m., Audubon Greenwich at 613 Riversville Road is offering a true birding experience with Luke Tiller.

Birders meet in main building parking area to start on-site or depart for nearby birding locations.

No charge, but RSVP required to luke.tiller@gmail.com. For more information, call 203-869-5272, ext.239.

Coastal cleanup scheduled

Tomorrow, Oct. 13, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., volunteers are needed for the Greenwich Green and Clean International Coastal Cleanup.

All shoreline trash/litter to be picked up and brought to a table at the gatehouse for a coastal inventory.

For information contact grgeenclean@aol.com.

Help with college admissions essay

Tomorrow, Oct.13 at 11 a.m., The Friends of the Cos Cob Library, 5 Sinawoy Road, in the Community Room of the Library are presenting "How to jump start your college admissions essay," featuring a free workshop for high school seniors with Michele Turk, on how to write a winning college admissions essay. For more information, or to sign up, call 203-622-6883.

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Record

North Central Community Calendar — Oct. 4-10

Posted By on October 10, 2012

Send your North Central public event notices (including recreational sports) for free to Edmond Ortiz at eortiz@primetimenewspapers.com; by fax at 250-3350; or by mail to him in c/o North Central News, P.O. Box 2171, San Antonio, TX 78297-2171. Submissions must be received by noon Friday prior to the next desired publication date. Items run on a space-available basis.

ONGOING

Wellness/support

Alzheimer's Association, San Antonio and South Texas Chapter, co-sponsors Living with Alzheimer's, a series of free informational programs for caregivers 6-7:30 p.m. today and Oct. 18, and Nov. 1 at Arden Courts of San Antonio, 15290 Huebner Road. Caregivers will listen to discussions about a variety of issues pertaining to people coping with Alzheimer's disease. Seating is limited. RSVP at: 408-9100 or sanantonio@arden-courts.com.

North Central Baptist Hospital hosts its third annual Girls' Night Out 6-9 p.m. Oct. 11 at The Village at Stone Oak retail center (near Alamo Drafthouse Cinema), 22610 U.S. 281 North. The event is designed to help promote women's health and breast cancer awareness in a fun, relaxing environment. Attendees are also invited to help to raise funds for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation. There will be a cancer survivor fashion show, free health screening, a silent auction, drawings, information from area health providers and businesses, and free refreshments.

Nydia's Yoga Therapy Studio, 4680 Lockhill-Selma Road, is hosting a variety of daily and semi-daily classes, such as yoga in Spanish, gentle yoga and yoga for children. Contact: 764-1616 or http://www.nydiasyogatherapy.com.

St. George Episcopal Church Mental Health Family Support Group holds its regular meeting at 7 p.m. second Wednesdays at 6904 West Ave. in Castle Hills. Call: 342-4261.

Eczema Support Group has formed. Contact: Gabi Mehta, EczemaGroupSA@yahoo.com or 748-8824; or Pam Van Scoyk, EczemaGroupSA@yahoo.com or 862-1684.

Oak Meadow United Methodist Church, 2740 Hunters Green, begins a faith and sports program for boys and girls, ages 6-11, interested in playing soccer. Contact: The Rev. Benitez, 378-9283.

North Central Baptist Hospital, 520 Madison Oak, hosts support groups and free educational programs: couples dealing with fertility issues meet 6 to 7 p.m. every fourth Tuesday within the atrium (call 297-4483); cancer patients and their loved ones meet at 10 a.m. fourth Saturdays (297-7005); pediatric asthma education classes 9:30 a.m. each third Saturday (297-7005); gestational diabetes program starts at 9 a.m. every second and fourth Monday in the second floor education room (297-7005); expectant mothers and their families can tour the hospital's women's service area at 5, 6 and 7 p.m. each first Monday; Gamblers Anonymous, 7 p.m. Thursdays (260-2616). Free health screenings are offered 7:30 a.m.-noon Tuesdays. Also, Bridges Beyond Grief meets at 10-11 a.m. Tuesdays at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 20523 Huebner Road, and 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays at Independence Hill Retirement Community, 20450 Huebner (297-4752). Additionally, Baptist Health System is sending families a summer safety tip online each week beginning in June. Visit: http://www.BaptistMomsAndKids.com.

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North Central Community Calendar — Oct. 4-10

Raja Shehadeh: ‘Every aspect of Palestinian life is affected by the occupation’ – Video

Posted By on October 10, 2012

10-10-2012 04:28 Raja Shehadeh: 'Every aspect of Palestinian life is affected by the occupation' Palestinian writer and lawyer Raja Shehadeh talks about his experience of growing up in the West Bank. Shehadeh discusses the day-to-day hardships of living under Israeli occupation and reflects on episodes from his journal Occupation Diaries, as well as considering the effects of the Arab spring on the region as a whole

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Raja Shehadeh: 'Every aspect of Palestinian life is affected by the occupation' - Video

Romney's 'Stark Contrast' at Times Not Stark

Posted By on October 8, 2012

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign promised last week he would outline a "stark contrast" between his proposals and President Obama's "failed" efforts to put an American stamp on the evolving face of the Middle East.

But a closer look at Romney's remarks today in Virginia reveal a varied gameplan, with some policies surprisingly similar to the president's and others, as advertised, broadly divergent.

The split is evident when one considers the composition of Romney's staff, one expert said, noting that the candidate has drawn from all corners of the Republican tent.

"There's an old adage to the affect that 'personnel is policy,'" and Romney's staff is "very much divided between the Neocon pole and the more traditionally Realist pole," Brookings Institution Senior Fellow William Galston said after the speech. "And if press reports are to be believed, Romney has taken advice from both. This is a pretty good camp strategy for keeping both sides of Republican establishment happy. What it means down the road has not been clarified."

From Libya to the Israelis and Palestinians, with mentions of Iran, Egypt, Al Qaeda and Syria pressed between, Romney hit all the Middle Eastern hotspots. Here's a case-by-case look at where the Republican set himself apart from President Obama and the issues on which they do, in fact, share more common ground than one might expect.

Romney said he would "pursue a real and successful transition to Afghan security forces by the end of 2014," right in line with the Obama timeline for withdrawal. Romney qualified this by saying he would "evaluate conditions on the ground and weigh the best advice of our military commanders" before making that decision.

When asked after the speech if Romney would, in fact, delay the return home of American troops from Afghanistan if he wasn't satisfied with the situation on the ground, his campaign would not offer a definitive response.

"I read the speech as opening up that question without giving an answer to it," Galston said of Romney potentially extending U.S. troops' stay in the country. "Obama's commitment to a date is pretty unequivocal. I don't read Romney's commitment as being similarly unequivocal. I guess the Romney campaign is entitled to say we'll cross that bridge when we get to it. I do think that refusing to endorse is distinction worth notice. What its cash value is remains to be seen."

Daniel Serwer, a senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins, said he'd be surprised if Romney veered too far from Obama's planned road home.

"He might push it back a couple of months," Serwer said in an email, "but he has never suggested anything more dramatic than that. This is a distinction without a difference."

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Romney's 'Stark Contrast' at Times Not Stark

Is Romney's 'Stark Contrast' Really That Stark?

Posted By on October 8, 2012

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign promised he would outline a "stark contrast" between his proposals and President Obama's "failed" efforts to put an American stamp on the evolving face of the Middle East.

But a closer look at Romney's remarks today in Virginia reveal a varied gameplan, with some policies surprisingly similar to the president's and others, as advertised, broadly divergent.

The split is evident when one considers the composition of Romney's staff, one expert said, noting that the candidate has drawn from all corners of the Republican tent.

"There's an old adage to the affect that 'personnel is policy,'" and Romney's staff is "very much divided between the Neocon pole and the more traditionally Realist pole," Brookings Institution Senior Fellow William Galston said after the speech. "And if press reports are to be believed, Romney has taken advice from both. This is a pretty good camp strategy for keeping both sides of Republican establishment happy. What it means down the road has not been clarified."

From Libya to the Israelis and Palestinians, with mentions of Iran, Egypt, Al Qaeda and Syria pressed between, Romney hit all the Middle Eastern hotspots. Here's a case-by-case look at where the Republican set himself apart from President Obama and the issues on which they do, in fact, share more common ground than one might expect.

Romney said he would "pursue a real and successful transition to Afghan security forces by the end of 2014," right in line with the Obama timeline for withdrawal. Romney qualified this by saying he would "evaluate conditions on the ground and weigh the best advice of our military commanders" before making that decision.

When asked after the speech if Romney would, in fact, delay the return home of American troops from Afghanistan if he wasn't satisfied with the situation on the ground, his campaign would not offer a definitive response.

"I read the speech as opening up that question without giving an answer to it," Galston said of Romney potentially extending U.S. troops' stay in the country. "Obama's commitment to a date is pretty unequivocal. I don't read Romney's commitment as being similarly unequivocal. I guess the Romney campaign is entitled to say we'll cross that bridge when we get to it. I do think that refusing to endorse is distinction worth notice. What its cash value is remains to be seen."

Daniel Serwer, a senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins, said he'd be surprised if Romney veered too far from Obama's planned road home.

"He might push it back a couple of months," Serwer said in an email, "but he has never suggested anything more dramatic than that. This is a distinction without a difference."

Continue reading here:
Is Romney's 'Stark Contrast' Really That Stark?


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