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Jury selection begins in murder trial of Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll – WXYZ 7 Action News Detroit

Posted By on June 15, 2024

DETROIT (WXYZ) Jury selection began today in the murder for downtown Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll.

Woll was found stabbed to death outside her Lafayette Park home in October. In December, Detroit Police arrested Michael Bolanos Jackson, accusing the 28-year-old of stabbing Woll to death in a random home invasion.

VIDEO: Man charged in murder of Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll

Man charged in murder of Samantha Woll

We spoke to former U.S. attorney Matthew Schneider about selecting a jury, in a case that's garnered so much local and national media attention.

Jury selection is one of the least talked about things in a criminal trial and the most important," Schneider told us.

With all the media attention this story is getting, we asked what kind of challenges that added attention presents in selecting a jury.

"It's the same type of challenges we've seen on a larger scale with the Trump case, people are asking what have you heard about this case?," Schneider said. "Are you familiar about it, have you been watching it on the news or watching it in the media and even if you have, is that going to bias you or not."

Schneider says in a murder trial, the prosecution wants jurors who may have been victims of a crime, while the defense will look for people who may be skeptical of police narratives.

"Right now today were in a period of time were living through where a lot of people are questioning law enforcement, questioning the police, questioning evidence and these are the people the defense will certainly want to have on this jury," Schneider told us.

Prosecutors saythat Jackson-Bolanos was breaking into cars in the area that night, and Woll's blood was found on his jacket, but his DNA wasn't found at the scene, which is just some of the evidence that a jury will sort through.

What you really want is a jury who will listen to both sides, make a fair assessment, come to the correct conclusion about the law and the verdict in this case," Schneider said.

It started today at 9 a.m. at Wayne County Circuit Court. Schneider says the process could take a few hours to a few days.

7 News Detroti has a crew at jury selection. We will update this story with more information as it becomes readily available.

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Jury selection begins in murder trial of Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll - WXYZ 7 Action News Detroit

Noon Live Hit: Jury selection begins in murder trial of Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll – Yahoo! Voices

Posted By on June 15, 2024

Jury selection began today in the murder for downtown Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll. Woll was found stabbed to death outside her Lafayette Park home in October. In December, Detroit Police arrested Michael Bolanos Jackson, accusing the 28-year-old of stabbing Woll to death in a random home invasion.

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Noon Live Hit: Jury selection begins in murder trial of Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll - Yahoo! Voices

Apartment Construction Planned In Kensington, Brooklyn – New York YIMBY

Posted By on June 15, 2024

New York-based real estate law firm Rosenberg & Estis P.C. has secured rezoning approval for Agudist Council of Greater New York, a Brooklyn congregation, to rehabilitate its synagogue and senior center at 817 Avenue H in Kensington, Brooklyn. The site has been owned and operated by the Agudist Council since 1975.

The project will create 42 apartments and a revenue stream to support the long-term future of the synagogue, senior center, and other work of the Agudist Council. Rosenberg & Estis land use and zoning attorneys are known for their work in obtaining approvals for rezonings, special permits, and variances from city agencies.

David J. Rosenberg, Counsel at Rosenberg & Estis, represented the Agudist Council in the application process. The rezoning was one of three recently approved by the City Council that is expected to create over 300 apartments in Brooklyn. The city is currently advancing its City of Yes for Housing Opportunity proposal to address the housing crisis through various zoning changes.

We are pleased to have secured another successful outcome that benefits both our client and the city as it continues to advocate for more robust housing development, Rosenberg said. This development will create an important revenue stream that ensures the long-term future of the synagogue, senior center, and other important work of the organization, while also creating much needed, family-sized housing units.

At this time, neither renderings nor project details such as planned building amenities have been released. The property is located a short walk from the F and Q trains at the 18th Avenue and Avenue H subway stations.

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Apartment Construction Planned In Kensington, Brooklyn - New York YIMBY

A synagogue on the water: a journey following Amsterdam’s Jews – Ynetnews

Posted By on June 15, 2024

On the Kiddush tables at the Portuguese Synagogue (Esnoga) in Amsterdam every Shabbat morning were plates of herring, salmon, tuna and various pastries. When one member of the small community, a Dutchman of course, saw us focusing on eating herring, he wondered, "You like herring? Israelis and herring?" We responded, "There's no Shabbat without herring on our table." He then added humorously, "But herring like ours cant be found anywhere. When the prayer ends, some of us bend under the synagogue floor and pull fish straight from the water to the table."

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The Portuguese Synagogue (Esnoga) in Amsterdam

(Photo: Courtesy of the Jewish Museuem, Amsterdam)

This, of course, is a charming story, but it contains two important elements: the centrality of herring in the diet of the Dutch in general and Jews in particular, and the fact that the Portuguese Synagogue, inaugurated in 1675, stands on water. This led to thoughts of Emuna Alon's beautiful book House on Endless Waters, which tells the fate of Dutch Jewry during the Holocaust.

To many, the image of the Netherlands during World War II is entirely different and more favorable compared to Germany, Poland, Ukraine, Vichy France and other countries. However, this image is completely distorted. Of the approximately 140,000 Jews in the Netherlands on the eve of the Holocaust, more than 107,000, or about 75% of the Jewish community, perished during the darkest days.

The number of Righteous Among the Nations in the Netherlands is indeed exceptional, with 5,982 people recognized for protecting and saving Jewsan act worthy of high praise. However, this does not absolve their compatriots who betrayed thousands of Jews to the Nazi regime.

Noteworthy is the village of Nieuwlande in northeastern Netherlands, where all 117 residents were recognized as Righteous Among the Nations. Emuna Alon wrote in her book, "One cannot blame the Dutch for what happened, because the Dutch are simply disciplined by nature, accustomed to maintaining law and order and doing what they are told" (p. 63).

How can a small community museum with limited resources stand out and attract visitors in a city that boasts some of the world's largest, most important and beautiful museums? Moreover, the museum most associated with the Jewish story is the Anne Frank House, which draws thousands of visitors daily.

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The Jewish Museum in Amsterdam within the Former Great Synagogue Building

(Photo: Courtesy of the Jewish Museuem, Amsterdam)

We decided to forgo another visit to the Anne Frank House, which we had already visited multiple times, and instead explore the newly renovated Jewish Museum in Amsterdam. Its energetic director, Prof. Emile Schrijver, has made significant changes to the exhibits, both in terms of the items displayed and the overall scope.

While we did not skip the Rijksmuseum, thanks in large part to its 17th-century Rembrandt paintings and 19th-century Impressionist art, nor the nearby Van Gogh Museum, inspired by whose works we once traveled through southern France, our primary goal was the Jewish Museum. Our friend Bill Gross, the renowned Judaica collector, assured us we would be amazed by what we saw.

Bill delivered on his promise. Together with Prof. Schrijver, who constantly surprises us with new information, we toured the extensive complex comprised of four Ashkenazi synagogues in Amsterdamthe Great Synagogue, the New Synagogue, the Third Synagogue and Obbenbuilt in the 17th and 18th centuries. These synagogues, located in the Jewish Quarter, were left empty of worshippers after the Holocaust. The adaptation of the four synagogues into a museum took many years, and today they are filled daily with hundreds of visitors eager to learn about Dutch Jewry and the unique heritage of the community.

The impressive museum uses all available technological and museological means to captivate visitors. From the museum's collection of 11,000 items, several hundred Judaica artifacts were selectedsilver and gold items, manuscripts, paintings, religious objects such as an Ark, shofar, menorahs, household items representing daily life such as Kiddush cups, challah covers, Seder plates and moredisplayed in a visually appealing manner that overwhelms the visitor with their richness and color.

The manuscript collection offers insight into the unique traditions of Amsterdam's Jewish community, a blend of customs from the Iberian Peninsula brought by the expelled Jews of Spain and Portugal, and Ashkenazi traditions from Western Europe.

Charlotte Salomon, a Jewish-German artist who perished in the Holocaust, is a well-known name in Holocaust history and art history. She created 1,300 paintings in one year, documenting her family in a dramatic style. After the Holocaust, her parents relocated to the Netherlands, and in 2006, all her works were donated to the Jewish Museum in Amsterdam. "We have a unique and very special treasure," says Prof. Schrijver.

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Prof. Emile Schrijver

(Photo: Bob Bronshoff)

When I asked about visitors to the Jewish Museum in a city with many museums, Schrijver mentioned Jewish visitors from around the world, but even more so non-Jewish visitorsthousands of Dutch schoolchildren visit both the Jewish Museum and its additional part, the Holocaust Museum, about a ten-minute walk away. In both parts, they learn about Judaism in general and Holocaust history in particular within an organized classroom setting.

And what about Israelis? "Unfortunately, among the thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of Israelis who visit Amsterdam every year, only a few visit us," says Schrijver. Our recommendation: Don't miss it. Dutch Jewry welcomes everyone, and in the Jewish Museum, you'll discover a world of beauty you never knew existed.

Amsterdam's Jewish Quarter is a popular destination, drawing hundreds, sometimes thousands, of visitors daily. By nine in the morning, at least ten tour groups, mostly non-Jews, were already wandering around the quarter centered on Waterlooplein, just minutes from Dam Square, waiting to see the area's treasures.

Even before the Holocaust, the synagogue building adjacent to the Jewish Museum was designated a national heritage site, and it still has no electric lighting, just as it did 350 years ago. On the rare nights when prayers are held there, they take place by the light of hundreds of hanging or fixed candles.

The synagogue is meticulously maintained; everything is spotless, the silver and gold artifacts are polished and the Ark looks as if it was handcrafted recently. The floor remains as it originally wassand over parquetto maintain silence, absorb dust and moisture and most importantly, as a reminder of the Israelites' journey through the desert.

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A painting by Charlotte Salomon

(Photo: Courtesy of the Jewish Museuem, Amsterdam)

The synagogue itself, where 30-40 Jews pray on Shabbat, is built on wooden stilts standing in water, and maintenance boats can navigate underneath it. Surrounding the synagogue is a large courtyard enclosed by low buildings forming a kind of wall. These buildings include the winter synagogue (with lighting and heating), offices, the community archive, the Etz Chaim Library, a mikveh and a tahara house.

The Etz Chaim Library, a must-visit, was founded in 1639 and is renowned in Jewish literary history. It moved to its current location in 1675 and is recognized as the oldest functioning Jewish library in the world. Since 2013, it has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Heidi Warncke, the curator and director, speaks Hebrew and is deeply knowledgeable about Jewish life and tradition. Her expertise in Jewish literature is impressive, and she holds a Ph.D. in Jewish Studies.

The beautiful library houses 30,000 books, all related to Judaism, including hundreds of historically significant manuscripts. The eye cannot tire of seeing and reading the numerous books and manuscripts that Warncke lays out, many of which you may have only heard of or seen in photographs.

Here are the originals, centuries old. The extensive and fascinating collection covers all the walls, creating an atmosphere of silence and contemplation; a magical world for thought, reading and writing on all aspects of Jewish law, history, philosophy and science.

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Exhibition of Charlotte Salomon's Paintings at the Jewish Museum in Amsterdam

(Photo: Dorit Rappel)

The entire Jewish Museum complex and the Portuguese Synagogue are worth a full day's visit. Time with our hosts is limited, so we move quickly from Heidi to Miriam Knutter, who takes us to the treasures of the Portuguese Synagogue, gathered in the room that once served as the rabbi's study, the adjacent rooms and the rooms below. Miriam, born in the Netherlands, lived in Israel for several years, is married to an Israeli and speaks fluent Hebrew.

"At home, we speak Hebrew, and our children are fluent in Hebrew," she says. Emphasizing Hebrew highlights that the museum and its staff are very friendly to Israeli visitors. A significant portion of the staff speaks Hebrew, making the visit more pleasant and enjoyable.

The name of architect Daniel Libeskind is almost automatically associated with Holocaust memorialization and the preservation of Jewish memory. Despite his numerous unique works, the Jewish Museum in Berlin and the large memorial in Amsterdam are undoubtedly two of his most significant projects in this field. The story behind the Amsterdam memorial is worth knowing.

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Passover Haggadah Printed in Amsterdam

(Photo: Dorit Rappel)

Sammy Herman, a Jew born in England who moved with his parents to the Netherlands in his youth, guides us through the Holocaust section. Sammy, who makes his living translating books from Dutch to English, lives near the Portuguese Synagogue and, as an observant Jew, he walks to the synagogue every Shabbat to ensure there is a quorum of worshippers. Sammys Hebrew is also quite good.

The initiative to memorialize Dutch Jewry began in 1950. Five years after the Holocaust, a monument was erected to commemorate the approximately 100,000 Dutch Jews who perished. In those days, the prevailing belief was that the Dutch did everything possible to save Jews from certain death, and thus the monument was named "Gratitude."

Over the years, as research expanded and more documents and testimonies were discovered, it became clear that the rosy picture painted by the first monument was as dark as that recognized in other European countries. Against this backdrop, a new initiative emerged to build a more accurate memorial, which was erected on a main thoroughfare in the city, just a five-minute walk from the Jewish Museum and the synagogue.

The planning was entrusted to architect Daniel Libeskind, who designed on an area the size of a basketball court a series of walls that, when viewed from above, form the word "Remember." The walls were built from 102,000 silicate bricks, each inscribed with the first name of one of the Dutch Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

It seems almost necessary to proceed from this special monument to the new, large Holocaust Museum, which opened only about three months ago with the presence of King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands, Israeli President Isaac Herzog, the chancellor of Austria and many other dignitaries, most notably the families of Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

Every Holocaust memorial museum offers a unique approach chosen by the architect and curators to depict the destruction and cruelty of the Nazi regime. At Amsterdam's Holocaust Museum, I found particular interest in the personal items donated by community members for displayspoons from their parents' home, plates, religious artifacts, clothingeach item and exhibit bringing visitors closer to the Jewish Dutch families that were murdered.

There is hardly a devoted Hebrew book lover who isn't familiar with the Rosenthaliana Library, the largest Jewish library in continental Europe outside of England, now part of the University of Amsterdam. The university has long maintained a program in Jewish Studies.

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Rosenthaliana Library

(Photo: Dorit Rappel)

My personal memories led me to a large building on the bank of one of Amsterdams canals, a place I had visited before. However, in this case, the Hebrew saying "Change your place, change your luck" appliesthe university relocated the library, which houses over 120,000 books, 1,000 manuscripts, ephemera (one-day printed materials), incunabula (books printed before 1500) and various archives, to a new building in the heart of the city, just a few minutes' walk from most of Amsterdam's main attractions.

The library, founded in 1880, began with the personal collection of Eliezer (Lazer) Rosenthal (1794-1868). Rosenthal's heirs wanted to donate the entire collection to Germany, offering it to Chancellor Otto von Bismarck. After the German leader showed no interest and refused to accept the library, they offered it to the Netherlands, which gladly accepted it. Since the national library is part of the university, it was transferred to the University of Amsterdam.

In the library's reading room, we are greeted by the curator and director, Dr. Rachel Boertjens. She was born in Jaffa, the daughter of a former minister at Immanuel Church. She is also fluent in Hebrew. She shows us some of the library's "big stars"mainly manuscripts and hand-illustrated books, each copy unique.

The old library space was small, cramped and operated within a few closed rooms. The new location is more spacious, and the procedures for examining books are stricter. Rachel busily brings out interesting and special books, and together we explore various editions of the Amsterdam Haggadah from 1695, the Esslingen Machzor from the 11th century, Hebrew books printed over the years in Amsterdam, the Jacob de Haan archive and other great and wondrous surprises.

Amsterdam is a city of tourists and tourism. Thanks in large part to Prof. Schrijver, who has positively transformed the meticulously preserved Jewish sites overseen by the Dutch government, the tour stimulates an appetite to stay longer, delve into manuscripts and rare books, get to know the various museums better, and discover that there is much more to see beyond the sites that attract millions of tourists.

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A synagogue on the water: a journey following Amsterdam's Jews - Ynetnews

Teen neo-Nazi jailed over Hove synagogue bomb plans – Brighton and Hove News

Posted By on June 15, 2024

A teenage neo-Nazi has been jailed for eight years for creating a detailed plan to carry out a suicide bomb attack on a synagogue because he wanted to make Jews afraid again.

Mason Reynolds, 19, of Moulsecoomb Way, Brighton, was convicted at trial of possession of an article connected with the preparation of an act of terrorism against the synagogue in Hove.

He had also pleaded guilty to five counts of possessing material likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism, as well as five offences of sharing terrorist publications dating back to when he was aged 16.

The defendant had shared right-wing videos and possessed bomb instruction manuals, Winchester Crown Court was told.

The court was also told that Reynolds had annotated a Google street map and satellite image of the synagogue detailing entry points and points to attack.

Naomi Parsons, prosecuting, said: Whilst preparation is described as limited, it is not absent, for Mr Reynolds had a neo-Nazi mindset and he had prepared an extensive library of manuals, explosives manuals, gun-making manuals.

She added: There was the potential to endanger many lives, he included references to the days when the the synagogue would be busiest, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Passover.

Ms Parsons continued: He had an entrenched and violent neo-Nazi mindset and had expressed an intention to commit terrorist acts I wanna strap multiple pipe bombs to my chest and blow myself up in a synagogue.

He knew that those he communicated with shared that mindset.

Ms Parsons said that Reynolds used the Telegram social media site to encourage others with his propaganda channel to promote the neo-Nazi agenda and he posted that he wanted to make Jews afraid again.

He also possessed recorded live-streamed videos of mass-murder terrorist attacks including those produced by Brenton Tarrant in Christchurch, New Zealand, and Anders Breivik in Norway, the court was told.

Ms Parsons said: They are clips from live-streamed attacks and that is the point of them, thats what makes them so dangerous, they are designed to aid copy-cat attacks.

He also posted a promotional video for the proscribed, white supremacist, terrorist organisation, Atomwaffen Division, showing a man in a skull mask and combat gear shooting targets.

Reynolds showed no emotion as he was given an extended sentence made up of eight years in custody with a five-year period on licence.

The judge, Dame Juliet May, known as Mrs Justice May, told him that she considered him to be dangerous and added: You intended to encourage terrorism. This was propaganda pure and simple.

Of the terrorist documents kept by Reynolds, she added: It is a startlingly extensive and concerning collection kept secret from your family and friends but showing how entrenched your interest in far-right ideology had become.

Amy Packham, defending, said that Reynoldss interest in the far right developed during the covid-19 lockdown and added: He would never have taken this action into real life.

This was all online, behind the barrier of the internet. That is his stated evidence and the view of his family is that there is no risk.

Counter Terrorism Policing South East (CTPSE) said that Reynolds had praised attacks by far-right terrorists.

He added: Reynolds created a note detailing a plan to attack a synagogue in Hove.

Following a police search of his home, various devices were found which had been used to store or share material, including an iPhone and USB drives.

He was also found to be the administrator of a Telegram channel which shared far right extremist, anti-Semitic and racist views, as well as manuals on bomb building and how to 3D print firearms.

Nick Price, head of the CPS Counter Terrorism and Special Crime Division, said: Mason Reynolds sought to spread hate and encourage acts of terrorism.

He not only held neo-Nazi beliefs but wanted to act on them to cause pain and suffering, which fortunately has been prevented and the public protected due to the work of the policing and prosecution team.

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Teen neo-Nazi jailed over Hove synagogue bomb plans - Brighton and Hove News

Testimony set to begin Wednesday in trial of man accused of killing Woll – WXYZ 7 Action News Detroit

Posted By on June 15, 2024

DETROIT (WXYZ) A jury has been seated in the trial for Michael Jackson-Bolanos, the man accused of murdering Detroit synagogue leader Samantha Woll.

Opening statements took place on Tuesday afternoon with both Wayne County Assistant Prosecutor Ryan Elsey and defense attorney Brian Brown presenting before court adjourned for the day.

VIDEO: Prosecution gives opening statement in Samantha Woll murder trial

Prosecution gives opening statement in Samantha Woll murder trial

VIDEO: Defense gives opening statement in Samantha Woll murder trial

Defense gives opening statement in Samantha Woll murder trial

Testimony is expected to begin Wednesday.

Story after Monday's trial below

Day 1 of jury selection for the trial of the Detroit man accused of murdering Samantha Woll began with journalists being told they would not be allowed to sit in the courtroom, or even be in the courthouse - an unusual start to the trial for a case that has been unusual from the start.

I mean this is a first that youre not allowed in the courthouse itself, wow, said legal expert and attorney Todd Flood.

He said, A judge can not allow cameras in, but a judge, its my understanding that its the publics court, theyre allowed to have reporters there to report on the case.

If Flood had to pick a reason why the public was being told they could not be in the courtroom he said its most likely being kept closed for the privacy of the jurors as the case is one that has already garnered national attention.

It all started on Saturday, October 21 2023 when beloved community Jewish leader Samantha Woll was found dead, stabbed eight times outside of her Detroit apartment.

RELATED STORY: Detroit synagogue president found dead outside home; police to provide update Sunday

Detroit synagogue president found dead outside home; police to provide update Sunday

Police believe 40-year-old Woll was attacked inside her home and stumbled outside sometime after midnight after arriving home from a wedding.

There were no signs of forced entry at her home.

Weeks later Michael Jackson-Bolanos, a Detroit man in his late 20s was arrested and charged with Wolls murder.

RELATED STORY: Man charged with murder in killing of Samantha Woll, Detroit synagogue leader

Man charged with murder in killing of Samantha Woll, Detroit synagogue leader

Police say they dont think the two knew each other, which is odd to those who study crime.

Oftentimes you will find that there is a connection in rage type multiple stabbings, strangulations, said Flood.

Jackson-Bolanos is charged with first-degree murder, felony murder, first-degree home invasion, and lying to police in connection with Wolls death.

RELATED STORY: Prosecutors detail evidence that led to arrest of suspect in Samantha Woll's murder

Prosecutors detail evidence that led to arrest of suspect in Samantha Woll's murder

The prosecution has shown video evidence that they say links Jackson-Bolanos to Wolls neighborhood the night of her death.

Investigators say they found a black North Face jacket in Jackson-Bolanos apartment that had stains on it.

The stains were tested and investigators say they are close to certain that the blood on the jacket belongs to Woll.

Jackson-Bolanos attorney has said his client is denying all allegations against him and his client is likely a victim of circumstance.

Theyre going to try to cut holes, theres no footage, theres no camera, theres no ability to connect me to that scene, except for the government is going to rebut that with obviously DNA, said Flood.

The court expects opening statements in this trial to begin Tuesday at 1 p.m.

7 News Detroit will be there.

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Testimony set to begin Wednesday in trial of man accused of killing Woll - WXYZ 7 Action News Detroit

Teenage neo-Nazi who planned attack on synagogue jailed for eight years – LBC

Posted By on June 15, 2024

14 June 2024, 16:28

A teenager from Brighton who created a detailed plan to carry out a suicide bomb attack on a synagogue has been jailed eight years.

Mason Reynolds, 19, from Moulscoomb was convicted of possession of an article connected with the preparation of an act of terrorism against Hove Synagogue in East Sussex.

At the time, he had been studying bricklaying and roofing while doing part-time labouring roof on the side.

He lived with his parents and was described as leading in many ways, a not untypical existence of a young man in his late teens".

The defendant had shared right-wing videos and possessed bomb instruction manuals, Winchester Crown Court heard.

The 19-year-old had annotated a Google street map and satellite image of the synagogue detailing "entry points and points to attack, the court also heard.

Naomi Parsons, prosecuting, said: "Whilst preparation is described as limited, it is not absent, for Mr Reynolds had a neo-Nazi mindset and he had prepared an extensive library of manuals, explosives manuals, gun-making manuals.

She added: "There was the potential to endanger many lives, he included references to the days when the the synagogue would be busiest, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Passover."

Ms Parsons continued: "He had an entrenched and violent neo-Nazi mindset and had expressed an intention to commit terrorist acts.

Read more: We will intervene: German police warn England fans coming to the Euros dont sing Ten German Bombers

Read more: Killer dad-of-two jailed for 13 years after beating 'bragging' serial paedophile to death

She also said that Reynolds used the Telegram social media site to encourage others with his "propaganda channel to promote the neo-Nazi agenda" and he posted that he wanted to "make Jews afraid again".

Reynolds also pleaded guilty to guilty to five counts of possessing material likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism, as well as five offences of sharing terrorist publications dating back to when he was aged 16.

The judge, Mrs Justice May, told him that she considered him as "dangerous" and added: "You intended to encourage terrorism, this was propaganda pure and simple."

A Counter Terrorism Policing South East (CTPSE) spokesman said that Reynolds had "praised attacks by far-right terrorists".

He added: "Reynolds created a note detailing a plan to attack a synagogue in Hove.

"Following a police search of his home, various devices were found which had been used to store or share material, including an iPhone and USB drives.

"He was also found to be the administrator of a Telegram channel which shared far right extremist, anti-Semitic and racist views, as well as manuals on bomb building and how to 3D print firearms."

Read more from the original source:

Teenage neo-Nazi who planned attack on synagogue jailed for eight years - LBC

Brighton teen due to be sentenced for preparing synagogue terror attack – Brighton and Hove News

Posted By on June 15, 2024

A Brighton teenager is due to be sentenced for creating a detailed plan to carry out a terror attack at a synagogue in Hove.

Mason Reynolds, of Moulsecoomb Way, Brighton, was convicted by a jury of having an article connected with the preparation of an act of terrorism.

The teenager had previously admitted five counts of having material likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism as well as five offences of sharing terrorist publications.

The 19-year-old neo-Nazi had shared right-wing videos and had bomb instruction manuals, according to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS).

Reynolds was convicted by a jury by a 10-2 majority at Winchester Crown Court in April of preparing an act of terrorism at the synagogue in Hove.

Today (Friday 14 June), he is due to be sentenced at the same Hampshire court by the trial judge, Dame Juliet May, known as Mrs Justice May.

After the jurys verdict, the CPS said that Reynolds had praised attacks by far-right terrorists, adding: Reynolds created a note detailing a plan to attack a synagogue in Hove.

Following a police search of his home, various devices were found which had been used to store or share material, including an iPhone and USB drives.

He was also found to be the administrator of a Telegram channel which shared far-right extremist, anti-semitic and racist views, as well as manuals on bomb building and how to 3D print firearms.

Nick Price, head of the CPS counter-terrorism and special crime division, said: Mason Reynolds sought to spread hate and encourage acts of terrorism.

Todays guilty verdict, along with his earlier guilty pleas, show that he not only held neo-Nazi beliefs but wanted to act on them to cause pain and suffering, which fortunately has been prevented and the public protected due to the work of the policing and prosecution team.

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Brighton teen due to be sentenced for preparing synagogue terror attack - Brighton and Hove News

The Forbidden Daughter review: A fascinating look at the legacy of the Holocaust – The Jewish Chronicle

Posted By on June 15, 2024

The Forbidden Daughter is a fictionalised Holocaust biography that isnt really about the Holocaust. Instead, its about the legacy of tragedy; the way trauma passes down the generations and the fact that peace does not really mark the end of the fight.

Elida Friedman was one of many children handed over to non-Jewish families by desperate parents who were trapped in ghettos and headed for the concentration camps. Born illicitly in the Kovno Ghetto in Lithuania, she was a newborn when she was taken in and never saw her parents again. Instead, in the postwar years, she oscillated between various homes and between various countries, reuniting with relatives and meeting other Jews who had survived against the odds, but never really finding a secure identity.

The Jewish baby became a Christian toddler, then a Russian- speaking child, a pre-teen in early-state Israel, before being transplanted to Texas to become an all-American teenager. Throughout, she was an orphan, unmoored by this constant reinvention, and hardened, one assumes, by an ongoing sense that her place in the world was at best transient. Tough for anyone and the Elida on the page comes across as resilient, yet lacking emotional intelligence or empathy.

Once in America, her intellect allowed her to thrive, but her story was never straightforward, although its hard to decipher whether this was ill-fortune or a direct product of her upbringing. Zipora Klein Jakob, a cousin of Elidas, does justice to the complexity of the story and has clearly done exhaustive research. But there are few letters or diaries to draw on, nor even any interviews with Elida, and (likely out of respect) the author is not keen to probe. The result is that readers are left without insight into what drove Elida or how she processed her past.

This, combined with the unsophisticated, emotional prose, means the book has more in common with YA fiction than most Holocaust biographies. Thats not necessarily a strike against it: Elidas story is fascinating, and she was, of course, one of so many whose childhoods were irreparably broken by what the Nazis did. Illuminating their experiences is important work. This is a book for a curious teen, interested to learn more about not just the Holocaust, but the way it has shaped Jewish lives ever since.

There is a breathtaking twist in the final pages: suffice to say Elidas life was no fairy tale even after the Nazi threat subsided. But one happily ever after; children, grandchildren and an immense extended family around today to tell her story and that of her parents, who made a choice nobody should have to.

The Forbidden DaughterbyZipora Klein Jakob

HarperCollins, 9.99

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The Forbidden Daughter review: A fascinating look at the legacy of the Holocaust - The Jewish Chronicle

He Helped Rescue Thousands from the Nazis, Then Kept His Story Quiet for Decades – USC Shoah Foundation |

Posted By on June 15, 2024

In a five-hour interview with the USC Shoah Foundation, Justus Rosenberg refers to himself as a small fry, a cog, an unimportant person. And perhaps it was for this reason that for decades, the Bard College literature professor hadnt let onto his colleagues, to his students, and even, for a time, to his wifethat he had fought and outwitted the Nazis during World War II to save thousands from persecution.

Between the years of 1939 and 1947, with Forrest Gump-ian omnipresence, Rosenberg was a courier and guide for Varian Frys Emergency Rescue Committee in Marseilles, a spy and a guerilla soldier for the French underground, a scout for the U.S. Army, and a relief worker at United Nations camps for Displaced Persons in Germany. As a result, he was awarded the U.S. Bronze Medal and Purple Heart and made a commander in the French Legion of Honor.

Rosenberg first revealed the extent of these exploits when he recorded his Visual History Archive testimony in 1998 at the age of 77. In 2020 he published his memoirs, The Art of Resistance: My Four Years in the French Underground (HarperCollins).

Rosenberg died on October 30, 2021, at his home in Rhinebeck, New York, at the age of 100.

Justus (pronounced yus-tus) Rosenberg was born in The Free City of Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland) in January 1921 to a well-off Reform Jewish family. At that time, Danzig was heavily German and by 1935 its Nazi-dominated city government had enacted the Nuremberg laws, which encoded discrimination against Jews.

Rosenberg engaged with would-be persecutors even as a high school student.

In biology, one of the teachers, I remember, would ask me a question such as this: Could you tell me the reason why the Nuremberg Laws were enacted? My answer was, Well, for the safeguard of German blood. He says, Yes, that's correct And safeguard against who? Obviously, he wanted me to say against the Jews. And I was not going to say that. Well, after class I got a beating.

In 1938, Rosenbergs parents sent him to Paris to continue his education. When France surrendered to Nazi Germany in June 1940, Rosenberg headed toward the Spanish border, hoping to escape to Portugal.

At a movie house in Toulouse that had been converted into a shelter for refugees, he ran into Miriam Davenport, an American who took a liking to him because he resembled her brother. She invited Rosenberg to Marseilles to meet Varian Fry, an American journalist who had set up the Emergency Rescue Committee in the south of France with the support of the American government. Fry had arrived with a list of 200 intellectuals and artists to rescue from the Nazis, and the operation had since mushroomed. Davenport and American heiress Mary Jayne Gold were aiding in the effort.

Rosenberg was 19 but looked like a 15-year-old Aryan when he met Fry. He also spoke French, German, English, Polish and Yiddish. Fry hired him to carry messages and documents.

If caught with those papers, which were, of course, often illegal messages, I would have immediately ended up in a concentration camp, Rosenberg said.

Fry soon tasked Rosenberg with coordinating logistics with mobsters, sleeping in the office to guard the files, and helping manage the crowds in the hallways, where people lined up daily for interviews to determine whether they qualified for rescue. Thousands were turned away.

"I was somewhat annoyed, irritated, about the discrimination that was being made, by favoring intellectuals and sort of ignoring many people, other people who had no particularly great accomplishments, but were just as human as anybody else and deserved to be rescued just as well, Rosenberg said in his testimony.

Between the fall of 1940 and August 1941, the Emergency Rescue Committee extricated more than 1,000 people from Nazi-occupied territories, smuggling many over treacherous routes through the Pyrenees to Spain. Among those Frys operation rescued were Hannah Arendt, Marcel Duchamp, Marc Chagall, Heinrich Mann, Max Ernst, and Andr Breton.

All the while, Rosenberg kept an eye out for his own escape, and tried, with no success, to find word of his parents.

By August 1941, Frys operation had been shut down and Fry and his American cohorts were sent back to America.

At the end of 1941, Rosenberg set out to cross the Pyrenees with a friend, but he was arrested by French police and thrown in jail with a pimp and a guy who killed his wifes lover, he recalled.

He was released after a few weeks and then made his way with other refugees to a resort in Grenoble, France. In August 1942, he and hundreds of other foreign Jews in Grenoble were arrested and taken to a transit camp near Lyon. Rosenberg learned they would be sent to a work camp in Poland within the next few days.

Rosenberg knew what awaited Jews in Poland. So, with the help of a detainee who was a nurse, he faked peritonitis, moaning and groaning and rubbing a thermometer to show a fever.

The Geneva Convention said you cannot send prisoners away if they are sick or if they suffer from some sort of disease. You have, first, to re-establish their health. Then you can kill them, he quipped in his testimony.

A few days later, Rosenberg woke up in a hospital in actual painhis appendix had been removed.

During his recovery, he talked a nurse into sending a letter to an address that a social worker at the transit campa woman he had met in Grenoblehad slipped him. Within a few days, a priest showed up at the hospital with a bicycle and a change of clothes. Rosenberg slipped out of the hospital and got on the bike, standing as he pedaled to dull the pain, until he arrived at the church.

After a few weeks of recovery, he was sent to the French countryside and assumed the identity of Jean Paul Guiton, the nephew of his Protestant host. Under his new identity, he taught at Sunday school and became an ad salesman for the Yellow Pagesa cover for his work as a French underground spy.

This gave me justification to be in different towns, to go to bars where German soldiers were hanging out, or to other places, he said. The information he gathered was transmitted to England or North Africa.

But after a few months, the German army uncovered the operation, and Rosenberg escaped to join a guerilla military group in the French mountains in 1943. He learned to shoot and lob grenades, and he helped blow up German supply lines, railroads, and convoys.

In August of 1944, Rosenberg was on a mission when he ran into three American soldiers, recently landed at Normandy, who had lost their way. Rosenberg helped them back to base, where the lieutenant major, learning of Rosenbergs language and military skills, attached him to the 636th Tank Destroyer Battalion Reconnaissance Company as a scout and a liaison to locals.

You can imagine what it meant to me. First of all, I had these beautiful K-rationstoilet paper, chocolate, cigarettesthings I had not seen for years and years, Rosenberg said in his testimony.

The company offered to smuggle Rosenberg to the U.S. when the war ended in 1945, but Rosenberg wanted to wait for legal status. He returned to Paris, where he studied at the Sorbonne, and then went to Germany to work for the UN in the supply operations for DP camps.

During this time Rosenberg learned, with the help of the Red Cross, that his family had survived the war. His parents and sister had escaped Danzig in 1941 and made it to a ship in Turkey that was intended to take them to Palestine. But the British intercepted the ship one mile outside the port of Haifa and sent the Jewish refugees to a detention camp on the Island of Mauritius, where they spent the rest of the war. His family finally made it to Palestine in 1945.

But by the time Rosenberg made contact with his parents, he had secured a coveted visa to go to the US, sponsored by a fellow soldier and the University of Dayton, where he was offered a job teaching French. Justus father advised him to stick with his plans and go to America.

After gaining US citizenship in 1952, Rosenberg, then 31, traveled to Israel to see his parents for the first time since he was 16.

When his ship landed in Haifa, Justus was sound asleep after a night of partying.

[My father] saw all the people coming down from the boat, and not his son. Eventually, I woke up. And I went in my pajamas to the railing of the boat, and I looked down. And there I saw my father, whom I hadn't seen for 15 years. We had a family whistle that we used when I was a child. And I let go of that family whistle, and he looked up. He recognized me. No word was said, because we just looked at each other, Rosenberg recalled.

In the United States, Rosenberg earned an MA and PhD in linguistics and comparative literature at the University of Cincinnati, then taught at Dayton and Swarthmore and received tenure at Bard College in upstate New York. Rosenberg kept in touch with Miriam Davenport, Fry and others, and attended reunions of the Emergency Rescue Committee. In 1994, Yad Vashem recognized Varian Fry as a Righteous Among the Nations.

Rosenberg went to Israel often to visit his parents and his sister, who had three children and nine grandchildren. In 1997, after never having wed, he married Karin Kraft.

Rosenberg always retained a perspective of humility around his accomplishments. In his testimony, he acknowledged those who risked their own lives to help him, so he in turn could help others.

Some of my religious friendsand I have many of them in all quarters, Protestants, Catholics, and Jewstell me that God has designs on certain people and that it was God's finger who guided me. I think, to some extent, survival is a question of luck, of chance, of a coming together, concurrence of circumstances. And to seize the right moment and the opportunity that is being offered, that little, little hole that exists there, through which you may slip through.

Watch Justus Rosenbergs full testimony.

Continued here:

He Helped Rescue Thousands from the Nazis, Then Kept His Story Quiet for Decades - USC Shoah Foundation |


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