Page 21234..1020..»

Souls on Fire: Portraits and Legends of Hasidic Masters …

Posted By on July 10, 2018

‘).appendTo(flyout.elem());var panelGroup=flyout.getName()+’SubCats’;var hideTimeout=null;var sloppyTrigger=createSloppyTrigger($parent);var showParent=function(){if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} if(visible){return;} var height=$(‘#nav-flyout-shopAll’).height(); $parent.css({‘height’: height});$parent.animate({width:’show’},{duration:200,complete:function(){$parent.css({overflow:’visible’});}});visible=true;};var hideParentNow=function(){$parent.stop().css({overflow:’hidden’,display:’none’,width:’auto’,height:’auto’});panels.hideAll({group:panelGroup});visible=false;if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;}};var hideParent=function(){if(!visible){return;} if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} hideTimeout=setTimeout(hideParentNow,10);};flyout.onHide(function(){sloppyTrigger.disable();hideParentNow();this.elem().hide();});var addPanel=function($link,panelKey){var panel=dataPanel({className:’nav-subcat’,dataKey:panelKey,groups:[panelGroup],spinner:false,visible:false});if(!flyoutDebug){var mouseout=mouseOutUtility();mouseout.add(flyout.elem());mouseout.action(function(){panel.hide();});mouseout.enable();} var a11y=a11yHandler({link:$link,onEscape:function(){panel.hide();$link.focus();}});var logPanelInteraction=function(promoID,wlTriggers){var logNow=$F.once().on(function(){var panelEvent=$.extend({},event,{id:promoID});if(config.browsePromos&&!!config.browsePromos[promoID]){panelEvent.bp=1;} logEvent(panelEvent);phoneHome.trigger(wlTriggers);});if(panel.isVisible()&&panel.hasInteracted()){logNow();}else{panel.onInteract(logNow);}};panel.onData(function(data){renderPromo(data.promoID,panel.elem());logPanelInteraction(data.promoID,data.wlTriggers);});panel.onShow(function(){var columnCount=$(‘.nav-column’,panel.elem()).length;panel.elem().addClass(‘nav-colcount-‘+columnCount);showParent();var $subCatLinks=$(‘.nav-subcat-links > a’,panel.elem());var length=$subCatLinks.length;if(length>0){var firstElementLeftPos=$subCatLinks.eq(0).offset().left;for(var i=1;i’+ catTitle+”);panel.elem().prepend($subPanelTitle);}} $link.addClass(‘nav-active’);});panel.onHide(function(){$link.removeClass(‘nav-active’);hideParent();a11y.disable();sloppyTrigger.disable();});panel.onShow(function(){a11y.elems($(‘a, area’,panel.elem()));});sloppyTrigger.register($link,panel);if(flyoutDebug){$link.click(function(){if(panel.isVisible()){panel.hide();}else{panel.show();}});} var panelKeyHandler=onKey($link,function(){if(this.isEnter()||this.isSpace()){panel.show();}},’keydown’,false);$link.focus(function(){panelKeyHandler.bind();}).blur(function(){panelKeyHandler.unbind();});panel.elem().appendTo($parent);};var hideParentAndResetTrigger=function(){hideParent();sloppyTrigger.disable();};for(var i=0;i

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required.

$9.95 +$3.99shipping

Sold by: BOOKS WITHOUT BATTERIES

$10.82 +$3.99shipping

Sold by: allnewbooks

$17.34 +Free Shipping

Sold by: Wordery Specialist

Flip to back Flip to front

Here is the original post:

Souls on Fire: Portraits and Legends of Hasidic Masters …

Rashida Jones Ethnicity of Celebs | What Nationality …

Posted By on July 8, 2018

Birth Name: Rashida Leah Jones

Place of Birth: Los Angeles, California, United States

Date of Birth: February 25, 1976

Ethnicity:*African-American, with some English, Scottish, and Welsh (father)*Ashkenazi Jewish (mother)

Rashida Jones is an American actress, writer, and producer. She is the daughter of music producer Quincy Jones and actress and model Peggy Lipton. She is famous for her roles, Karen Filipelli on The Office and Louisa Fenn on Boston Public. Her sister is actress Kidada Jones.

Rashidas father is mainly of African-American (West African/Central African) ancestry, with some English, Scottish, and Welsh, heritage.

Rashidas mother is Jewish (of Russian Jewish and Latvian Jewish descent). Rashida was raised Jewish, studied Hinduism, and is now a practicing Jew.

Rashidas paternal grandfather was Quincy Delight/Delightt Jones (the son of Caesar Jones and Susannah/Susanna Burgess). Rashidas grandfather Quincy was born in South Carolina, and was a semi-pro baseball player. Caesar and Susannah were both black. Susannah was the daughter of West Burgess and Adele, or of Osborne Burgess and Elizabeth.

Rashidas paternal grandmother was Sarah Frances Wells (the daughter of Love Adam Wells and Mary Belle Lanier). Sarah was born in Mississippi. Love, who was black, was the son of Nelson Wells and Sarah Campbell. Mary Belle Laniers father, James Balance Lanier, was caucasian, and had mostly English, as well as Scottish and Welsh, ancestry. Mary Belles mother, Cordelia Dickson, was black.

Rashidas maternal grandfather was Harold Arlen Lipton (the son of Max Lipschitz and Alice Goldfarb). Harold was born in The Bronx, New York City. Max and Alice were Russian Jewish emigrants, Max from Slutsk and Alice from Brest. Max was the son of Harris/Harold Lipschitz and Rebecca Leah Pitovsky/Witkowsky. Alice was the daughter of Aaron Goldfarb and Frieda/Freude Bass/Bab.

Rashidas maternal grandmother was Rita Hetty Benson/Rosenberg (the daughter of Hyman Rosenberg and Jeanie Jane Benson). Rita was born in Dublin, Ireland. Hyman was a Russian Jewish emigrant, who was born in Saga, the son of Marko Benjamin Rosenberg and Sarah Hahn. Jeanie was born in Manchester, Lancashire, England, to Jewish parents from Latvia and/or Kaunas, Lithuania, Benjamin Joseph Bensohn/Benson, from Kovno, and Sophia Winestein/Weinstein.

A DNA test whose results were displayed on the show African American Lives (2006) stated that Rashidas fathers, Quincy Joness, genetic ancestry is:

*66% Sub-Saharan African*34% European

In his 2009 book about the show, In Search of Our Roots: How 19 Extraordinary African Americans Reclaimed Their Past, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. wrote that Quincys African DNA matches the Tikar people of Cameroon, the Sukuma people of Tanzania, the Tonga people of Mozambique, and the Fang people of Equatorial Guinea.

Sources: Genealogies of Rashida Jones https://www.geni.comhttp://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com

Genealogy of Rashida Jones (focusing on her mothers side) http://www.wikitree.com

kathclick/bigstock.com

Tagged as:African, African American, Ashkenazi Jewish, Belarusian Jewish, Cameroonian, English, English Jewish, Fang, Guinean, Irish Jewish, Jewish, Latvian Jewish, Lithuanian Jewish, Mozambican, Russian Jewish, Scottish, Sukuma, Tanzanian, Tikar, Tonga, Welsh

Link:

Rashida Jones Ethnicity of Celebs | What Nationality …

Hasidic Judaism – jewishvirtuallibrary.org

Posted By on July 6, 2018

The Hasidic movement started in the 1700’s (CE) in Eastern Europe in response to a void felt by many average observant Jews of the day. The founder of Hasidism, Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov (referred to as the “Besht,” an acronym of his name) was a great scholar and mystic, devoted to both the revealed, outer aspect, and hidden, inner aspect of Torah. He and his followers, without veering from a commitment to Torah, created a way of Jewish life that emphasized the ability of all Jews to grow closer to Gd via everything that we do, say, and think. In contrast to the somewhat intellectual style of the mainstream Jewish leaders of his day and their emphasis on the primacy of Torah study, the Besht emphasized a constant focus on attachment to Gd and Torah no matter what one is involved with.

Early on, a schism developed between the Hasidic and nonHasidic (i.e., Misnagdim, lit. “opponents”) Jewish movements, primarily over real or imagined issues of halachic observance. The opposition was based on concern that the Hasidim were neglecting the laws regarding appropriate times for prayer, and perhaps concern about the exuberance of Hasidic worship, or a concern that it might be an offshoot of false messiahs Shabbtai Zvi or Jacob Frank. Within a generation or two, the rift was closed. Since then, many Hasidic practices have influenced the Misnagdim, while the Misnagdim, in turn, moderated some of the extremes of early Hasidism. Nevertheless, the dispute between particular groups of Hasidim and Misnagdim continues to this day, especially in Israel.

Today, Hasidim are differentiated from other Orthodox Jews by their devotion to a dynastic leader (referred to as a “Rebbe”), their wearing of distinctive clothing and a greater than average study of the inner aspects of Torah.

There are perhaps a dozen major Hasidic movements today, the largest of which (with perhaps 100,000 followers) is the Lubavitch group headquartered in Brooklyn, NY. Other groups include the Bobov, Bostoner, Belzer, Gerer, Satmar, Vizhnitz, Breslov, Puppa, Bianer, Munkacz, and Rimnitz. In Israel, the major Hasidic groups besides the Lubavitch include: Gor (Gerer), Viznitz and Bealz (Belzer).

Read the original here:

Hasidic Judaism – jewishvirtuallibrary.org

Study Estimates Ashkenazi Jewish Womens Risk of Having …

Posted By on July 6, 2018

About 5% to 10% of breast cancers are thought to be hereditary, caused by mutated genes passed from parent to child.

Genes are short segments of DNA(deoxyribonucleic acid)found in chromosomes. DNA contains the instructions for building proteins. And proteins control the structure and function of all the cells that make up your body.

Think of your genes as an instruction manual for cell growth and function. Abnormalities in the DNA are like typographical errors. They may provide the wrong set of instructions, leading to faulty cell growth or function. In any one person, if there is an error in a gene, that same mistake will appear in all the cells that contain the same gene. A genetic error that causes harm is called a mutation.

Many inherited breast cancer cases are associated with two gene mutations: BRCA1 (BReast CAncer gene one) and BRCA2 (BReast CAncer gene two).

The average woman in the United States has about a 1 in 8, or about 12%, risk of developing breast cancer in her lifetime. Women who have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (or both) can have up to an 80% risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetimes. Breast cancers associated with an abnormal BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene tend to develop in younger women and occur more often in both breasts than cancers in women without these abnormal genes.

Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation also have an increased risk of developing ovarian, colon, and pancreatic cancers, as well as melanoma.

You are substantially more likely to have a genetic mutation linked to breast cancer if:

Ashkenazi Jewish women have a much higher risk of having one of three founder mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This is part of the reason why Ashkenazi Jewish women have a much higher-than-average risk of breast cancer.

A founder mutation is a specific gene mutation in a population that was founded by a small group of ancestors that were geographically or culturally isolated. Because the population was isolated, the rate of founder mutations in descendants is much higher than it would be if the population were larger and comingling with more genetically diverse people.

Still, there are some Ashkenazi Jewish women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer who test negative for one of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 founder mutations. Researchers wondered if offering Ashkenazi Jewish women comprehensive genetic testing for all mutations linked to breast cancer would be beneficial.

A study suggests that offering comprehensive genetic testing for all mutations linked to breast cancer to Ashkenazi Jewish women, rather than simply testing for only the three BRCA1 or BRCA2 founder mutations, would help prevent breast cancer in this high-risk population.

The study was published online on July 20, 2017 by the journal JAMA Oncology. Read Genetic Predisposition to Breast Cancer Due to Mutations Other Than BRCA1 and BRCA2 Founder Alleles Among Ashkenazi Jewish Women.

Mary-Claire King, professor of medical genetics at the University of Washington, is one of the authors of the study. Dr. King is the scientist who discovered that mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 were linked to a higher risk of breast cancer.

To do the study, the researchers did genetic testing on blood samples from 1,007 women in the New York Breast Cancer study. The blood samples were tested for all known genetic mutations linked to breast cancer.

The New York Breast Cancer Study was started in 1996 to identify all the genes responsible for a higher risk of breast cancer among Ashkenazi Jewish women. Between 1996 and 2000, women who experienced a first diagnosis of breast cancer and who identified themselves and all four grandparents as Ashkenazi Jewish were invited to participate. The women were treated at 12 major cancer centers in the New York City metropolitan area and continue to be followed.

The genetic testing results showed that:

Of the 903 women without a BRCA1 or BRCA2 founder mutation:

Only four of the seven women with a different BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation had a family history that suggested that they might have a higher than average risk of breast cancer.

Of the 31 women with a mutation in a gene other than BRCA1 or BRCA2:

Of the 29 CHEK2 mutations:

Overall, about half the women with a genetic mutation linked to breast cancer had no close family history of breast or ovarian cancer:

According to this study, an Ashkenazi Jewish woman who has been diagnosed with breast cancer who doesnt have a founder BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation has about a 1% risk of having a different BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. If the woman was diagnosed before age 40, this risk increases to about 3%. The risk that an Ashkenazi Jewish woman who has been diagnosed with breast cancer who doesnt have a founder BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation has a CHEK2 or other mutation linked to breast cancer is about 3% to 4%.

Among [New York Breast Cancer Study] participants, approximately half of the patients with a damaging mutation in any breast cancer gene did not have a family history suggesting inherited predisposition, the researchers wrote. Mutations in these families were likely inherited from fathers, and the combination of small family size and chance in genetic transmission yielded few female relatives carrying mutant alleles. Therefore, to limit genetic testing to patients with a suggestive family history is to miss about 50% of patients with actionable mutations. The most recent national screening guidelines recommend genetic testing for all Ashkenazi Jewish patients with breast cancer. This recommendation is fine, but testing women only after they develop cancer severely limits the power of precision medicine. To discover a mutation only after cancer is diagnosed is a missed opportunity to have prevented that cancer.

If you are an Ashkenazi Jewish woman, you may want to talk to your doctor about this study and ask if having a comprehensive genetic test for all genetic mutations linked to breast cancer makes sense for you and your unique situation.

For more information on genetic and breast cancer risk, visit the Genetics page in the Breastcancer.org Lower Your Risk section.

Published on July 26, 2017 at 12:03 PM

See original here:

Study Estimates Ashkenazi Jewish Womens Risk of Having …

Orthodox Judaism: Hasidism – Jewish Virtual Library

Posted By on July 5, 2018

The Hasidic movement started in the 1700’s (CE) in Eastern Europe in response to a void felt by many average observant Jews of the day. The founder of Hasidism, Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov (referred to as the “Besht,” an acronym of his name) was a great scholar and mystic, devoted to both the revealed, outer aspect, and hidden, inner aspect of Torah. He and his followers, without veering from a commitment to Torah, created a way of Jewish life that emphasized the ability of all Jews to grow closer to Gd via everything that we do, say, and think. In contrast to the somewhat intellectual style of the mainstream Jewish leaders of his day and their emphasis on the primacy of Torah study, the Besht emphasized a constant focus on attachment to Gd and Torah no matter what one is involved with.

Early on, a schism developed between the Hasidic and nonHasidic (i.e., Misnagdim, lit. “opponents”) Jewish movements, primarily over real or imagined issues of halachic observance. The opposition was based on concern that the Hasidim were neglecting the laws regarding appropriate times for prayer, and perhaps concern about the exuberance of Hasidic worship, or a concern that it might be an offshoot of false messiahs Shabbtai Zvi or Jacob Frank. Within a generation or two, the rift was closed. Since then, many Hasidic practices have influenced the Misnagdim, while the Misnagdim, in turn, moderated some of the extremes of early Hasidism. Nevertheless, the dispute between particular groups of Hasidim and Misnagdim continues to this day, especially in Israel.

Today, Hasidim are differentiated from other Orthodox Jews by their devotion to a dynastic leader (referred to as a “Rebbe”), their wearing of distinctive clothing and a greater than average study of the inner aspects of Torah.

There are perhaps a dozen major Hasidic movements today, the largest of which (with perhaps 100,000 followers) is the Lubavitch group headquartered in Brooklyn, NY. Other groups include the Bobov, Bostoner, Belzer, Gerer, Satmar, Vizhnitz, Breslov, Puppa, Bianer, Munkacz, and Rimnitz. In Israel, the major Hasidic groups besides the Lubavitch include: Gor (Gerer), Viznitz and Bealz (Belzer).

Go here to read the rest:

Orthodox Judaism: Hasidism – Jewish Virtual Library

Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the …

Posted By on July 3, 2018

‘).appendTo(flyout.elem());var panelGroup=flyout.getName()+’SubCats’;var hideTimeout=null;var sloppyTrigger=createSloppyTrigger($parent);var showParent=function(){if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} if(visible){return;} var height=$(‘#nav-flyout-shopAll’).height(); $parent.css({‘height’: height});$parent.animate({width:’show’},{duration:200,complete:function(){$parent.css({overflow:’visible’});}});visible=true;};var hideParentNow=function(){$parent.stop().css({overflow:’hidden’,display:’none’,width:’auto’,height:’auto’});panels.hideAll({group:panelGroup});visible=false;if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;}};var hideParent=function(){if(!visible){return;} if(hideTimeout){clearTimeout(hideTimeout);hideTimeout=null;} hideTimeout=setTimeout(hideParentNow,10);};flyout.onHide(function(){sloppyTrigger.disable();hideParentNow();this.elem().hide();});var addPanel=function($link,panelKey){var panel=dataPanel({className:’nav-subcat’,dataKey:panelKey,groups:[panelGroup],spinner:false,visible:false});if(!flyoutDebug){var mouseout=mouseOutUtility();mouseout.add(flyout.elem());mouseout.action(function(){panel.hide();});mouseout.enable();} var a11y=a11yHandler({link:$link,onEscape:function(){panel.hide();$link.focus();}});var logPanelInteraction=function(promoID,wlTriggers){var logNow=$F.once().on(function(){var panelEvent=$.extend({},event,{id:promoID});if(config.browsePromos&&!!config.browsePromos[promoID]){panelEvent.bp=1;} logEvent(panelEvent);phoneHome.trigger(wlTriggers);});if(panel.isVisible()&&panel.hasInteracted()){logNow();}else{panel.onInteract(logNow);}};panel.onData(function(data){renderPromo(data.promoID,panel.elem());logPanelInteraction(data.promoID,data.wlTriggers);});panel.onShow(function(){var columnCount=$(‘.nav-column’,panel.elem()).length;panel.elem().addClass(‘nav-colcount-‘+columnCount);showParent();var $subCatLinks=$(‘.nav-subcat-links > a’,panel.elem());var length=$subCatLinks.length;if(length>0){var firstElementLeftPos=$subCatLinks.eq(0).offset().left;for(var i=1;i’+ catTitle+”);panel.elem().prepend($subPanelTitle);}} $link.addClass(‘nav-active’);});panel.onHide(function(){$link.removeClass(‘nav-active’);hideParent();a11y.disable();sloppyTrigger.disable();});panel.onShow(function(){a11y.elems($(‘a, area’,panel.elem()));});sloppyTrigger.register($link,panel);if(flyoutDebug){$link.click(function(){if(panel.isVisible()){panel.hide();}else{panel.show();}});} var panelKeyHandler=onKey($link,function(){if(this.isEnter()||this.isSpace()){panel.show();}},’keydown’,false);$link.focus(function(){panelKeyHandler.bind();}).blur(function(){panelKeyHandler.unbind();});panel.elem().appendTo($parent);};var hideParentAndResetTrigger=function(){hideParent();sloppyTrigger.disable();};for(var i=0;i

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required.

$42.36 +Free Shipping

Sold by: Wordery USA

$36.71 +$9.74shipping

Sold by: super_star_seller

Flip to back Flip to front

The rest is here:

Stella’s Sephardic Table: Jewish family recipes from the …

Birmingham Public Library: Jewish American Heritage Month

Posted By on June 30, 2018

by Mary Beth Newbill, Southern History Department, Central LibraryMay is Jewish American Heritage Month and the Library of Congress, the National Archives and Records Administration, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and several other government agencies are joining together to honor and celebrate Jewish Americans. First proclaimed by President George W. Bush on April 20, 2006, each successive president has declared the month of May to be a time when we reflect on the accomplishments and contributions of Jewish Americans. President Donald Trump issued the 2018 proclamation on April 30.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) will be streaming interviews with three Holocaust survivors this month. The first interview took place on May 3 and the other two will be on May 9 and May 10. Viewers can watch them live or stream them later at their convenience on the USHMM website.

The Birmingham Public Librarys Southern History Department has plenty of resources for those researching their Jewish ancestry. In addition to books on genealogy, we also have many titles relating to the Jewish experience in the South, histories of Jewish congregations in Alabama, and fun titles like Shalam Yall and Matzoh Ball Gumbo. Check out our newest subject guide on Jewish Heritage for links to these titles and many others.

The popular genealogy database, Ancestry.com has a special section on Jewish genealogy. Their Jewish Family History Collection contains numerous databases that are available for free. For those that require a subscription, the library edition of Ancestry.com is available at all of Alabamas public libraries.

Follow the links below for more information on Jewish genealogy and history:American Jewish ArchivesBirmingham Holocaust Education CenterDouglas E. Goldman Jewish Genealogy CenterIsrael Genealogy Research AssociationJewishGen

See the article here:

Birmingham Public Library: Jewish American Heritage Month

Where are Ashkenazi Jews from? Their Origins May Surprise …

Posted By on June 27, 2018

Ashkenazi Jews are a Jewish ethnic group who have their earliest ancestors from the indigenous tribes of Israelat least on one side of the family tree. A study published in 2013 in Nature Communications has shown their maternal lineage comes from a different, and possibly unexpected, source.

The research shows the origins of the matrilineal line for the Ashkenazi Jews comes from Europe. This goes against the common belief that Jewish people first arrived in central Europe after the ByzantineSasanian War of 602628 and only began settling in Germany in the Medieval period.

Ashkenazi Jews is the term used today to describe these Jewish people individuals who built religiously-based communities centuries later in Central and Eastern Europe. One of the things they are recognized for is the use of Yiddish a High German language written in the Hebrew alphabet and influenced by classical Hebrew and Aramaic.

The Yiddish calligraphic segment in the Worms Mahzor. ( Public Domain )

The 2013 study co-author Martin Richards, an archaeogeneticist at the University of Huddersfield in England, said that while Ashkenazi Jews have lived in Europe for many centuries, the results of the study using DNA samples show that most European Jews descend from local people who converted to Judaism, not individuals who left Israel and the Middle East around 2,000 years ago.

Ashkenazi Jews were declared a clear, homogeneous genetic subgroup following a 2006 study. Ashkenazi Jews come from the same genetic group, no matter if their ancestors were from Poland, Russia, Hungary, Lithuania, or another place with a large historical Jewish population. They are all in the same ethnic group.

How could it be that Ashkenazi Jews are just one genetic group? The answer is a relatively simple one: they didnt reproduce at a noticeable level with others outside their group (not even with other Jewish people). Researchers have shown Ashkenazi Jews were a reproductively isolated population in Europe for about 1000 years.

Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch ben Yaakov Ashkenazi (1714). ( Public Domain )

Previous studies have found that 50-80% of the Ashkenazim DNA from the paternal lineage originated in the Near East. It is not surprising that there was a common belief that Israel and the Near East was their ancient homeland.

But the 2013 study showed 80% of Ashkenazi Jews maternal line comes from Europe – only a few people had genes originating in the Near East. As Professor Richards said at the time, This suggests that, even though Jewish men may indeed have migrated into Europe from Palestine around 2000 years ago, they seem to have married European women.

A Jewish couple from Worms, Germany, with the obligatory yellow badge on their clothes. The man holds a moneybag and bulbs of garlic, both often used in the portrayal of Jews. 16th century. ( Public Domain )

It appears that the majority of the European converts to Judaism during the early years of the Diaspora were women. That helps explain why the Ashkenazim can trace their female lineage to southern and western Europe.

In conclusion, Richards said , The origins of the Ashkenazim is one of the big questions that people have pursued again and again and never really come to a conclusive view.

Top Image: Detail of Ashkenazi Jews praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (1878 painting by Maurycy Gottlieb) Source: Public Domain

By April Holloway

Read the original post:

Where are Ashkenazi Jews from? Their Origins May Surprise …

B’nai B’rith UK Home – B’nai B’rith UK

Posted By on June 27, 2018

Welcome to the Bnai Brith UK website. I am delighted that you want to find out more about Bnai Brith and what we can offer you.

We are a division of Bnai Brith Europe, which comes under the umbrella of Bnai Brith International, founded in 1843 in New York.

I am certain you will find many things of interest to you as you look through our website, Bnai Brith has a long and well-established history which focuses on advocacy, human rights, charitable work and Jewish Culture and Heritage. Not only in the United Kingdom, but also in Europe and worldwide. Our social activities play an important part in the life of our Lodge membership (Lodge is the historic name we give to our groups) and provides the basis for our wider activities.

Bnai Brith offers a warm welcome to those who join our family, whatever your age, be it younger or older or whether you are single or married or just good friends. We are an inclusive membership organisation that brings together Jews from across the whole spectrum whether they are observant or secular.

I hope that our website will interest you and will inspire you to join us.

I look forward, with much pleasure, to welcoming you into the worldwide family of Bnai Brith.

See the article here:
B’nai B’rith UK Home – B’nai B’rith UK

The New Christian Zionism: Fresh Perspectives on Israel …

Posted By on June 26, 2018

“In certain circles, the cause of Christian Zionism has acquired a bad odor. Some would-be sympathizers cringe at its history of dubious end-times speculation, while others want to avoid blessing the government and military policies of Israel. The theologians and historians included in this volume propose, as its titles suggests, a new Christian Zionism, grounded not in the belief that Israel is ‘a perfect country’ or ‘the last Jewish state we will see before the end of days,’ but in sound biblical theology and common-sense political wisdom.” (Matt Reynolds, Christianity Today, September 2016)

“In this exciting and extraordinarily important work, Gerald McDermott and his contributors point us toward a fresh way of understanding the relationship between Christianity and Judaismone in which Israel is not regarded merely as a voice from the past or a transitional entity consigned to a passing dispensational role, but regarded instead as an essential and enduring presence at the heart of the church’s ongoing life. In their view, the ‘scandal of Zionism’ is an instance of the ‘scandal of particularity’ at the very core of the gospelthe paradox that the biblical God has conveyed a universal message by means of a particular people and a particular land whose particularity is never to be effaced or superseded. If they are right, the implications are enormous for Christians and Jews alike.” (Wilfred M. McClay, G. T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty, University of Oklahoma)

“This book is rigorous in its scholarship and speaks with thoughtfulness and passion about an understudied and widely misunderstood subject. This important book is both learned and provocative. It is clearly written and argued throughout and displays a wealth of historical understanding, theological richness and exegetical savvy. This book is a must-read for all who are interested in the truly big questions of our day.” (Byron R. Johnson, Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University)

“The essays here offer a fresh perspective on Christian Zionism, one based on careful biblical exegesis and in dialogue with the historic traditions of the church. A paradigm-challenging volume.” (Timothy George, founding dean, Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, general editor of the Reformation Commentary on Scripture)

More here:
The New Christian Zionism: Fresh Perspectives on Israel …


Page 21234..1020..»