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Oakland synagogue celebrates new year with long-awaited eruv J. – The Jewish News of Northern California

| September 15, 2020

When is a door not a door? Well, if youre a member of Beth Jacob Congregation in Oakland and are tasked with helping to make a community eruv, or boundary used on Shabbat, you have to get creative

Jerusalems Great Synagogue will be closed for the High Holidays for the first time – Cleveland Jewish News

| September 15, 2020

(JTA) Jerusalems Great Synagogue will be closed during the High Holidays for the first time since it opened more than 60 years ago. In a statement on Sunday, the synagogue cited the risk of worshippers passing the coronavirus to others.

Three synagogue arsons in one month in the most progressive US cities – JNS.org

| September 15, 2020

(September 15, 2020 / JNS) After an arson attempt at The Way Christian Church church in Berkeley, the pastor and the media blamed it on a racist who was lashing out at the churchs Black Lives Matter banner.

Petition Launched to Save Rego Park Synagogue and Diner from Demolition – Forest Hills Post

| September 15, 2020

Sept. 14, 2020 By Allie Griffin A Queens resident launched a petition Sunday to protect a Rego Park synagogue, a diner and a group of small businesses from the wrecking ball. A developer who owns the triangular lot at 98-81 Queens Blvd.

United Synagogue ‘amazed’ at speed of shuls adapting to new Covid-19 rules – Jewish News

| September 15, 2020

The United Synagogue has said it is amazed at how quickly synagogues have adapted to government guidance on what Jews can and cant do during this months High Holy Days. If follows the issuance of detailed rules on Monday to ensure that Jewish gatherings over the festive season including for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot limit the spread of coronavirus, after consultation with Public Health England.

NJ Jews will adapt high holidays to the COVID crisis with TV shows and shofar house calls – NorthJersey.com

| September 15, 2020

Morning prayer service (Shacharit) in Fair Lawn takes place at the back of Congregation Shomrei Torah in Fair Lawn on 09/10/20.

Preparations under way for Jewish New Year – without synagogues and big dinners – Sydney Morning Herald

| September 15, 2020

Rabbi Lazarow said usually there would be 1800 people at Saturday morning services, a choir of 30 people and six or seven people leading the main service.

We must end educational neglect in ultra-Orthodox schools. Here’s why | Opinion – The Journal News

| September 15, 2020

Moshe Lobel, Special to the USA TODAY NETWORK Published 10:44 a.m. ET Sept.

EU: Greece-Turkey crisis talks might include other nations – Arab News

| September 15, 2020

KIEV: Hundreds of Hasidic Jews including children, who have sought to travel to a pilgrimage site in Ukraine, are being held up at the countrys border with Belarus due to coronavirus restrictions.Tens of thousands of Hasidic Jews travel every Jewish New Year to the town of Uman in central Ukraine to visit the tomb of Rabbi Nahman, the founder of the Breslov Hasidic movement.This year the Jewish New Year is celebrated September 18-20.The pilgrims set off even though last month the Ukrainian and Israeli governments called on Hasidic Jews not to travel to Uman, a town of 80,000 people, this year, fearing a spike in coronavirus infections.Kiev has banned foreigners from entering the country until late September.On Tuesday, President Volodymyr Zelensky discussed the situation at the border with the head of the state border guard service, Sergiy Deyneko, his office said. Ukraine had full control of the situation, it added.In Belarus, strongman Alexander Lukashenkos office said he had told officials to provide assistance to the pilgrims, accusing Ukraine of shutting its borders and leaving hundreds of people in neutral territory.The Belarus Red Cross Society said the pilgrims did not have enough resources to ensure their basic needs and assistance was being provided, particularly to parents with children, the elderly and people with disabilities.As of Tuesday morning, 690 pilgrims were at the Ukrainian-Belarusian border and hundreds more were expected to arrive, Kiev said.We expect that three charter planes some 600 foreigners will arrive in Minsk, Deyneko said, referring to the capital of Belarus.He said up to 1,000 people were expected to arrive at the border near Ukraines northern Chernigiv region, while in the northwest up to 700 were expected near Zhytomyr region and up to 1,500 people near Volyn region.Officials have put up a roadblock 700 meters from a checkpoint in the Chernigiv region and deployed aircraft and drones to monitor the border, Zelenskys office said in a statement.The Ukrainian authorities have been in touch with the Israeli embassy in Kiev and the pilgrims are receiving water and kosher food from local Jewish organizations.Separately, the border guard service said people waiting at the border were still trying to enter Ukraine even after having received explanations and were fully aware of the entry restrictions for foreigners.Rabbi Nahman is one of the main figures of Hasidism, a mystical branch of Judaism that appeared in the 18th century and which developed in particular in Poland and Ukraine.Ukraine has reported more than 159,000 cases of coronavirus and over 3,200 fatalities.Israel is set to impose a three-week lockdown there from Friday, to try to counter a surge in coronavirus infections.

Seen to the Eye | Kenneth Ryesky | The Blogs – The Times of Israel

| September 15, 2020

The Rabbis of the Talmud have instructed that a fence be built around the Torah, meaning that we should set for ourselves limits well within the Torahs bare minimums so that people do not inadvertently transgress them. From this has come the concept of Marat Ayin (seen to the eye, whereby certain activities, though technically not in violation of the Torahs commandments, are discouraged because an uninformed observer might conclude mistakenly that such activities are acceptable, or that the person who engages in such activities is transgressing the rules. Marat Ayin is often invoked in the context of a religiously-observant Jew entering a non-kosher restaurant to use the restrooms or some purpose other than to eat treif food


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