Page 1123

The luck of the black-eyed peas | Vanburen | thecabin.net – Log Cabin Democrat

| January 4, 2021

If you are like most families in the south you are accustomed to the annual tradition of eating black-eyed peas on New Years Day. Thought to bring good luck, the origin of the practice dates way back. Some historians trace the practice back to its possible Jewish roots

Israeli Black Panthers, Moroccan Jews and their social movement against discrimination – Yabiladi in English

| January 4, 2021

When Moroccan Jews immigrated to Israel in 1940s, they were promised a better life. Hundreds of them left the Kingdom to start a new life in the country

5 lucky New Year’s traditions + how to do them in Birmingham – Bham Now

| January 4, 2021

Author Beth Cunningham - December 28, 2020December 29, 2020Wishing you a happy and lucky year, Bham. Photo via @hermez777 on Unsplash I dont know if any fresh start will ever be as anticipated as January 1, 2021.

Bye-bye 2020: ToI writers share important stories from a year of crisis and hope – The Times of Israel

| January 4, 2021

While the coronavirus pandemic caused the world to grind to a halt this year, some things have been business as usual: Israel is headed to yet another election, the environmental crisis continues unabated, traffic safety is still a major issue on Israeli roads Thankfully, the show must go on: Films and series continue to stream, concerts have moved online, academic forums are meeting virtually, and chefs have taken to giving cooking classes from their own kitchens. Even without the pandemic, 2020 has had its share of extraordinary and world-changing events mass demonstrations have rocked the United States, a top Iranian nuclear scientist was assassinated under mysterious circumstances, and no fewer than four Arab League nations have suddenly begun to forge ties with Israel, ushering in some fresh Middle East optimism

21 places to go in 2021: ‘The holidays we’re dreaming of this year’ – The Guardian

| January 4, 2021

Portugal A stroll and a gourmet treat by the river at Amarante My go-to place for escape is the mountains. In normal times, Id make a beeline for the granite-strewn plateaux of Serra da Estrela or the wooded slopes of Gers

Its being treated like a war: Israels rapid Covid-19 vaccination drive – The Irish Times

| January 4, 2021

More than one million of Israels population of 9.3 million have now received the first of two doses of the Pfizer/BioNtech Covid-19 vaccine. Politics has played a role in the countrys drive to get people inoculated against the disease, with prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu, who will soon face another general election, of the belief that a successful and rapid vaccination programme could lay the ground for victory

Oakland County community calendar Jan. 3 and beyond – The Oakland Press

| January 4, 2021

Business events Pontiac Chamber of Commerce hosts Fruitful Toast, 5:30-7 p.m.

This customized van is helping UK Holocaust survivors record their stories during the pandemic – JTA News – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

| January 4, 2021

(JTA) As one of the youngest Holocaust survivors, Eva Clarke has spent years telling the story of how her mother, weighing just 68 pounds, gave birth to her inside a concentration camp just a month before it was liberated. But this spring, as COVID-19 shut down public life, Clarkes visits to schools and community centers in the United Kingdom came to a screeching halt, indefinitely, she recalls. Earlier this month, she got a fresh audience when an RV pulled into her driveway in Cambridge.

Anonymous benefactor assures success of Cliftonville Save Our Shul campaign – The Isle of Thanet News

| January 4, 2021

Inside the Cliftonville synagogue By Kathy Bailes and Jodie Nesling A campaign to save a stunning Cliftonville synagogue from developers after it was put up for auction has been successful, largely thanks to an anonymous donation.

In 1800s Poland, Hasidic runaway girls spurred a Jewish school revolution – The Times of Israel

| January 4, 2021

NEW YORK There is a saying, Well-behaved women rarely make history. Its a sentiment that underpins author Rachel Manekins new book The Rebellion of the Daughters: Jewish Women Runaways in Habsburg Galicia. From the late 1800s until the eve of World War I, hundreds of young Jewish women living in Western Galicia, now Poland, fled their Orthodox, mostly Hasidic, homes to find refuge in a Krakw convent where some ultimately converted to Roman Catholicism


Page 1123