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Concentration camps The Holocaust Explained: Designed for …

| June 1, 2021

Generally speaking, a concentration camp is a place where people are concentrated and imprisoned without trial. Inmates are usually exploited for their labour and kept under harsh conditions, though this is not always the case

31 states don’t require schools to teach about the Holocaust. Some laws are changing that – CNN

| June 1, 2021

"The Holocaust was a unique event in human history, encompassing evils so great it is nearly indescribable," said Amy Lutz, a spokesperson for the St.

Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum reopens with new hands-on experience – WSYR

| June 1, 2021

OSWEGO, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) After being closed for several months because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum in Oswego is reopen to the public

Input sought on civics, Holocaust education standards in Florida – Wink News

| June 1, 2021

WINK NEWS How should civics and English be taught to our children? That Florida Department of Education is launching a listening tour this week to give you a chance to weigh in.

Commentary: In comparing COVID-19 vaccines to the Holocaust, the idiots have outdone themselves Tennessee Lookout – Tennessee Lookout

| June 1, 2021

It should go without saying that one should never trivialize the Holocaust.

Holocaust survivor, psychologist and author Edith Eger to give online presentation – The Advocate

| June 1, 2021

Part of me was left in Auschwitz, but not the better part, Dr. Edith Eger said

UAB history students use Birmingham newspaper archives to create powerful project with the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center – UAB News

| June 1, 2021

Emma Herr and Chris Bertolini examined Birmingham Public Library newspaper archives from the Nazi period of 1933-1945, focusing on key Holocaust events.

U.S. Faces Outbreak of Anti-Semitic Threats and Violence – The New York Times

| June 1, 2021

A brick shattering a window of a kosher pizzeria on Manhattans Upper East Side. Jewish diners outside a sushi restaurant in Los Angeles attacked by men shouting anti-Semitic threats. Vandalism at synagogues in Arizona, Illinois and New York

A Jew is a Jew is a Jew: What rising antisemitism is teaching the diaspor – The Jerusalem Post

| June 1, 2021

It has all the makings of a blockbuster disaster film: 1. The confluence of seemingly unrelated events taking place in different parts of the world; 2. The rising temperature that augers widespread destruction; and 3.The obliviousness of the vast majority of those who would be most impacted.No, its not an alien invasion nor a climate change disaster film, its the synopsis of what is increasingly awaiting Jews throughout the Western world, particularly in the places where they have traditionally felt most comfortable.One has to be willfully obtuse to not see the steady unfolding of ominous events, ranging from random attempted lynchings in the streets of Blue cities (not strongholds of white supremacy), to cynically manipulated pronouncements in prominent media, to unhinged rants by celebrities and muscle flexing progressive Democrats in Congress.Some in England see residual Corbynism resurfacing, while in Western Europe, the pretext of supporting Hamas has meant that any and all Jews are fair game.There are many attempts at trying to explain why its all so intense, and why now.

Hebrew language – Wikipedia

| June 1, 2021

Semitic language native to Israel Hebrew (, Ivrit(helpinfo), IPA:[ivit] or [ivit]) is a Northwest Semitic language of the Afroasiatic language family. Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites, Judeans and their ancestors. It is the only Canaanite language still spoken and the only truly successful example of a revived dead language, and one of only two Northwest Semitic languages still spoken, the other being Aramaic.[11][12] The language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Hebrew Bible, but as Yehudit ("the language of Judah") or spa Kna'an ("the language of Canaan").[2][note 1] Mishnah Gitin 9:8 refers to the language as Ivrit meaning Hebrew; however, Mishnah Megillah refers to the Hebrew language as Ashurit, meaning Assyrian, which is derived from the name of the alphabet used, in contrast to Ivrit meaning the paleo-Hebrew alphabet.[13] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date to the 10th century BCE.[14] Hebrew ceased to be an everyday spoken language sometime between 200 and 400 CE, declining in the aftermath of the Bar Kokhba revolt.[2][15][note 2] Aramaic and, to a lesser extent, Greek were already in use as international languages, especially among elites and immigrants.[17] Hebrew survived into the medieval period as the language of Jewish liturgy, rabbinic literature, intra-Jewish commerce and poetry


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