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Your Daily Phil: Bicycling in Jerusalem + Jewish migration in the U.S. – eJewish Philanthropy

Posted By on September 29, 2022

WHEEL CHANGEJerusalems cycling activists face an uphill climb

For secular Israelis, next week offers the opportunity for the best biking holiday of the year: Yom Kippur, when cars in Israel stay off the road and bicycles fill empty highways. But a group of activists is promoting cycling year-round in Jerusalem, where most Jews dont bike on the Day of Atonement and the hilly terrain makes for tough pedaling. After years of advocacy, theyre finally finding success,reports Melanie Lidman foreJewishPhilanthropy.

Pandemic push:For years, the group, called Bicycles for Jerusalem, has been beating on the door of City Hall, begging for meetings with the citys planners and trying to encourage more biking in the city. After public transit use decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, the capital slowly started incorporating more bicycle infrastructure. The change comes as the city is undergoing a massive facelift, with several large infrastructure projects, including an expansion of the light rail.

Growing paths:Before 2020, there were 30 miles of bike paths in Jerusalem, according to City Hall. But since then, the city has added 11 miles of paths, an increase of 34%. The Jerusalem Transportation Master Plan has called for 125 miles of bike paths across the citys 48 square miles. That still pales in comparison to Tel Aviv, which has 155 miles of bike paths in a city half the size.

Tunnel vision:The city is also actively promoting bike infrastructure, both for daily use and for fun. On Sept. 9, the city opened a new bicycle-only tunnel through the hills near the western neighborhood of Ein Kerem part of a 26-mile cycling path around the outskirts of the city. The tunnel was originally built in the 1990s to transport wastewater, and was opened only once a year to bikers for a special ride around Jerusalem. After $7 million of improvements, the tunnel is now open to bikers every day of the year. At 1.3 miles, it is the fifth-longest cycling tunnel in the world.

Read the full story here.

Throughout history, Jews have been a people on the move, from the nomadic Abraham and Sarah to Moses wandering in the desert, to the massive relocations of the modern era often spurred by antisemitic violence and poverty. This last contributed significantly to the creation of the two Jewish population mega-centers that exist today: Israel, anintentionally created Jewish state, and the United States, where Jews constitute an accepted and respected minority, writes Michael Weil, former executive director of the Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans, inan opinion piece foreJewishPhilanthropy.

U.S. inter-regional migration on the rise:As roughly 90% of all Jews now reside in these two centers, it can be argued that in the 21st century the Jewish people at last achieved a level of demographic stability, that the wandering Jews now wander no more. Yet, a closer look at the demographic trends in one of these centers, the U.S., reveals that within this population concentration, Jewish inter-regional migration rates are on the increase.

The need for national intervention:This level of geographic change poses critical challenges to Jewish continuity, particularly as preliminary research suggests that migration frequently results in reduced Jewish engagement and affiliation. National, strategic intervention, supplemented by detailed local initiatives, could help communities respond effectively to the demographic changes at play in their areas. But for such a plan to be developed and implemented, data on the extent and character of the moving populations needs to be gathered and analyzed.

Read the full piece here.

Since their founding in our country more than three centuries ago, synagogues have served as the mainstays of Jewish life, welcoming and helping generations of Jewish immigrants acculturate and articulate uniquely Jewish and American identities. But for far too long, many Jewish congregations have utilized a model of set dues that members need to pay for access. While most congregations express a value of welcome, set dues can create a financial barrier and shift the focus away from deep communal relationship, write Brian Lifsec, Rebecca Shore and Rabbi Joshua Stanton, of New York Citys East End Temple, inan opinion piece foreJewishPhilanthropy.

Community commitment:Its time to invert the model giving much and empowering and welcoming even more. Our community just became the first Reform congregation in Manhattan to align its fundraising with its values. We now empower our members to give to their hearts content, but without a formal mandate or fixed level. Our voluntary dues (community commitment) membership is poised to transform not only our presence externally, but how we relate internally.

Post-pandemic:East End Temple is blessed to be among the few synagogues and even fewer in major urban areas to emerge larger and more vibrant than we were in March 2020. What became evident during our time physically apart or in varying stages of hybrid togetherness was that lay-led programs engaged the most people in the most soulful ways.

Bottom up:With so much shifting to lay leadership, in intentional collaboration with our clergy, it no longer made sense to use a top-down funding approach of fixed dues. We have trusted our community members with key functions as never before. We can trust them to care for our community financially as well.

Read the full piece here.

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Your Daily Phil: Bicycling in Jerusalem + Jewish migration in the U.S. - eJewish Philanthropy

Amid rising threats, local Jewish orgs nab $2M in federal security funds J. – The Jewish News of Northern California

Posted By on September 29, 2022

Ten Bay Area synagogues and five other Jewish nonprofits have received money from the federal government to improve their security and help make them less vulnerable against antisemitic attacks.

The grant allocations, announced Sept. 14, will fund measures that support physical security enhancements at nonprofit organizations that are at a high risk of a terrorist attack, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which operates the program.

Those include many synagogues that were built at times when we were not worried about the threats were worried about today, said Rafi Brinner, director of community security at the S.F.-based Jewish Community Federation.

According to Brinner, 15 Bay Area Jewish organizations received grants that totaled more than $2 million. The Federation assisted nine organizations in applying, a process that requires security assessments and a detailed plan. All received funding, including three for the first time a great result, Brinner said.

Were impressed that we got 100 percent of the ones we supported, he said.

The nine nonprofits assisted by the Federation were Congregations Beth Emek (Pleasanton), Kol Shofar (Tiburon), Peninsula Sinai (Foster City), Beth Am (Los Altos Hills), Beth David (Saratoga) and Beth Jacob (Redwood City), plus the Oshman Family JCC (Palo Alto), Contra Costa Jewish Day School (Lafayette) and Chabad North Peninsula (San Mateo).

The other entities receiving grants were the Chabad at UC Berkeley, Chabad of the East Bay, Temple Beth El/Santa Cruz JCC, Congregation Emanu-El in San Francisco, the Reutlinger Community for senior living in Danville and URJ Camp Newman in Santa Rosa.

With antisemitic hate incidents on the rise, security is on everyones mind.

Brinner said synagogues designed in the 1950s and 1960s often have an open, ranch-style plan. Architects, rabbis and directors at that time wanted the congregants to be able to mingle freely, have many ways in and out of the building, and take advantage of the California sunshine.

Lets have lots of windows! Entire glass fronts! Brinner said.

But those features make buildings a security risk today. While some amount of what is known as facility hardening can be done to make the physical structures more secure, Brinner said the Federation also works with organizations that are planning renovations or new buildings.

Its a lot easier to plan it from the start than to tack it on after, he said.

The federal government isnt the only source of funding for security. In 2021, California drastically increased the amount of money for security grants, and a new state bill that extends the program was signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sept. 18.

Brinner currently is working on grant applications for the California funds; they are due at the end of October. Enough help is needed that hes hired a consultant.

Were working with over 20 organizations in the current [state grant] round, about a third of whom have never received a federal or state nonprofit security grant, he said in an email to J.

The Federation provides workshops and assessments in which Brinner and his team help organizations figure out their security needs and put together the detailed grant application. That includes conducting on-site assessments, identifying and prioritizing security improvements, detailing costs and specifications, and developing compelling narratives for grant applications, Brinner said.

He said the Federation is also cooperating with Black and Asian organizations on security education as part of an interfaith outreach. While Jewish schools, synagogues and nonprofits are in the sad position of having had a long history of countering attacks, at least the best practices can be shared.

Its broader than just the Jewish community, Brinner noted. We can share our lessons learned.

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Amid rising threats, local Jewish orgs nab $2M in federal security funds J. - The Jewish News of Northern California

Newish Jewish, at Kossars and Beyond – The New Yorker

Posted By on September 29, 2022

In Mimi Sheratons book The Bialy Eaters, from 2000, she entertains, and soundly dismisses, a theory that the bialy, a bagel-adjacent Jewish roll, originated not in Bialystok, Poland, but in New York. Bialyswhich are not boiled before theyre baked; which have shallow depressions at their centers instead of holes, to be filled with onions and poppy seeds, most traditionally; and which bear a dusting of white flourmay not have been invented here, but is there any city in the world where its easier to find them? In the nineties, on a trip to Bialystok, Sheraton failed to locate a single bialy. In 2022, Kossars, New Yorks most enduring bialy bakery, which opened on the Lower East Side almost a century ago, is expanding. In July, a second shop dbuted on the edge of Hudson Yards; a third is planned for the Upper East Side.

Kossars has evolved considerably over the years, as its changed hands. For a time, it was certified kosher. The other day, I was startled to see bacon on the menu at Hudson Yards, paired with chicken salad for a sandwich called the Houston Street. Sandwiches can be made on bialys or on bagels, the latter of which have becomea large part of the bakerys output. Historically, bialys, according to Sheraton, were not sliced at all before they were lightly schmeared, let alone loaded with pastrami-spiced smoked salmon and horseradish-pickle cream cheese, as for the Ludlow. Theres something a little sad about the open-faced Grand Streetavocado toast by another name, with a thick green mash topped with watery tomatoes that completely overpowers the bisected bialy.

I like my bialys sliced, but barely adorned. Are Kossars as good as they ever were? Sheraton would disapprove of the still raw onions (and the lack of poppy seeds) in the wells of the half-dozen I brought home, and would find the bread itself too pale. But toasting and buttering one filled me with a rush of happy nostalgia. At a point in history when the art of Ashkenazi food seems ever threatened, its heartening to see the growth of a legacy business. Kossars sells bacon but also pletzls, an Ashkenazi flatbread thats larger and even scarcer than the bialy. Russ & Daughters, that icon of appetizing, still owned by the family that founded it, has scaled up in recent years, adding a house-baked bialy (with both onions and poppy seeds), among other things, to the repertoire.

Over the years, Kossars added bagels to its output, but it continues to make bialys, and an even lesser-known Ashkenazi flatbread called a pletzl (center).

Fine & Schapiro, a deli on West Seventy-second Street, closed in 2020, after ninety-three years in business, but it was swiftly replaced by an outpost of the Upper East Sides Pastrami Queen, a fully kosher establishment that changed its name from Pastrami King when it moved from Queens in 1998, after forty-two years. On a recent afternoon, as the youngest Pastrami Queen customer by about fifty years, I enjoyed a bowl of chicken soup with kreplach and a chocolate egg cream. I took home some health salad and kasha varnishkes, plus a sweatshirt bearing the delis logo, the sort of old-school-New York merch that exemplifies Zizmorcore, a recent sartorial phenomenon that reached its logical conclusion earlier this year, when Coach collaborated with Zabars on a five-hundred-and-fifty-dollar leather tote emblazoned with a bagel.

The crowd was slightly younger on the other side of Broadway, at the first U.S. location of Sherry Herring, a kosher shop from Tel Aviv that makes herring downright sexy, sandwiching salt-water-cured filletsmatjes (younger, suppler) or schmaltz (older, meatier)on crusty baguettes with butter, sour cream, fresh chili pepper, scallions, and tomatoes.

On a recent morning at Ediths Eatery& Grocery, in Williamsburg, a full-service restaurant that evolved from a pandemic pop-up, I counted three babies. The daytime-only menu explores the Jewish diaspora: Russian pancakes, exceptionally fluffy with farmers cheese; Romanian steak and eggs; malawach, a flaky Yemeni Jewish flatbread. On the shelves, which enclose caf tables in charming nooks, Tam Tams crackers and the individually wrapped honey-sesame candies that my grandpa used to carry in his pocket share space with CBD Turkish delight and bottles of avocado oil, bridging the generational gap.

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Newish Jewish, at Kossars and Beyond - The New Yorker

US Jewish leaders, Erdogan meet for the first time in three years – JNS.org

Posted By on September 29, 2022

(September 28, 2022 / JNS) Behind the scenes of the annual U.N. General Assembly meeting last week, a group of American Jewish organizations was quietly working to improve ties between the global community, Israel and the world body.

Representatives from organizations under the umbrella of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations held a number of high-level meetings with world leaders in New York City.

Dan Mariaschin, CEO of Bnai Brith International, told JNS he was present for a meeting at the Turkish mission to the United Nations with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a leader who has had a cold and often adversarial relationship with Israel. The two countries recently announced a reopening of full diplomatic relations.

This is the first time in three years that that a meeting has taken place between representatives of the Jewish community and the president of Turkey. Anything that can be done to lower the temperature, to bring more stability to the region, I think is in everybodys interest, Mariaschin said.

Were also mindful at the same time that there is an important relationship going on in the eastern Mediterranean between Israel, Greece and Cyprus, related not only to energy but to other issues as well. But when you take the two together, the bottom line really is can we move towards more stability in the region? And thats why these meetings take place.

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Jewish leaders raised concerns about Hamass base in Turkey and Erdogans embrace of the Islamist organization, which openly seeks Israels destruction.

Its a terrorist organization. Our advice to any government that has relations with Hamas is that that relationship clearly can bring about no positive result. So, the issue was raised [with Erdogan] for sure, said Mariaschin.

We try to meet as many heads of delegations as we can that are leading countries with whom we have an agenda, and some with whom we dont have an agenda, he said.

He sat down last week with Germanys Chancellor Olaf Scholz and Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed and Bahraini Foreign Minister Abdullatif bin Rashid, along with the foreign ministers of Argentina and Croatia and the prime minister of Montenegro, among his 30-40 meetings revolving around the General Assembly.

Mariaschin said he and other Jewish leaders raised a host of matters with foreign dignitaries, including Iran, Holocaust restitution and strengthening and developing relations between Israel and other nations. The group also pressed leaders to take action on the United Nations ongoing bias against Israel.

This year were talking about the [U.N. Human Rights Council-sponsored] Commission of Inquiry against Israel. This commission, which has no shelf life [i.e., no expiry to its mandate], is headed by avowed critics, more than critics, enemies, of Israel. We talked about the need to press those who are leading that commission to resign their positions, because theyre not objective, said Mariaschin.

Jewish leaders from across the political and denominational also sat down with Israeli Prime Minister Yair Lapid prior to his General Assembly speech on Thursday. While Mariaschin noted that not every Jewish organization is completely aligned with every position of an Israeli government at a given time, we all came together because of our support for the State of Israel, our support for a strong and viable state of Israel, and particularly here at the United Nations, an organization where under the U.N. roof theres so much bias against the State of Israel.

It was vital, he said, that the American Jewish organizations and Lapid meet to show solidarity.

In his General Assembly speech, Lapid said, I am not a guest in this building. Israel is a proud sovereign nation, and an equal member of the United Nations. It was part of a deliberate and persistent strategy by Israeli officials at the U.N. of countering delegitimization efforts, including by a Commission of Inquiry member who recently questioned Israels standing as a U.N. member state.

Mariaschin noted there has been progress at the U.N. lately with regards to Israel, including the passage of an Israel-sponsored resolution condemning Holocaust denial and distortion and the work to resolve issues related to bias at UNESCO. Still, he said, the U.N. General Assembly meeting is a perfect time to remind world leaders just how far there is to go.

There was a resolution criticizing Israel for not giving vaccines to the Palestinians when in fact, just weeks before, [Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas] said he didnt want Israeli vaccines. There are the [U.N.] Palestinian committees that were set up in the wake of the Zionism is racism resolution back in the mid-1970s, that are still there, budgeted and staffed, and their only reason for existence is to delegitimize and demonize the State of Israel, said Mariaschin.

There are several Israelis who hold positions now in the U.N. system. That is important, and we have to note it. But, there still is a lot more work to be done, he said.

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US Jewish leaders, Erdogan meet for the first time in three years - JNS.org

Campuses hit by antisemitism on Rosh Hashanah + Is this Broadways most Jewish play? – Forward

Posted By on September 29, 2022

This article is part of our morning briefing. Click here to get it delivered to your inbox each weekday.

The High Holidays

Lost and found: Members of the Merrick Jewish Centre on Long Island were in for a treat when they showed up to Rosh Hashanah services. Recent renovations had uncovered a floor-to-ceiling sculpture from the 1960s. I was both stunned to see what we had been concealing for decades, said synagogue president Howard Tiegel, and confused as to why we permitted it to happen in the first place. Read the story

The stock market is in trouble for a lot of reasons. Could the Days of Awe be a contributing factor?

Are Jews who play baseball on the High Holidays really cursed? We ran the stats to find out.

Crime and politics

Jason Van Tatenhove, former national spokesman for the Oath Keepers, is now a witness for the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack. (Getty)

Trial and error: Jury selection began on Tuesday in the trial of five members of the Oath Keepers, the far-right group that stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6 in an attempt to overthrow the government. Our columnist Rob Eshman spoke this summer with the groups former national spokesman about why he left in 2016 after hearing some members express Holocaust denial. That was for me something I just could not abide, he said. Because I thought of my Jewish family. Read the story

State Sen. Doug Mastriano, the Republican nominee for Pennsylvania governor, accepted a $500 campaign contribution from the founder of the antisemitic social media platform Gab in July, according to newly released financial disclosure forms, even as Republicans joined Democrats in condemning Mastriano for paying Gab a $5,000 consulting fee.

Mexican police officers raided the compound of Lev Tahor, an extremist group dubbed the Jewish Taliban, last week. Two members of the sect were arrested on suspicions of human trafficking and sex crimes, report our partners at Haaretz. Sign up here to receive Haaretzs daily newsletter.

Culture

A scene from the new play, Leopoldstadt, starring Caissie Levy, inset. (Marc Brenner/Justin Patterson)

Faith and family: Leopoldstadt, the new play from Tony Award-winner Tom Stoppard, tells the tale of a Jewish family in Vienna from the turn of the 20th century through the Holocaust. It features a cast of 38, including Broadway star Caissie Levy. It explores a lot of the questions that Jews have been asking themselves since the beginning of time, she said. Where are we safe? Are we safe? Do we need a homeland of our own? Are we really accepted? How do we feel about our Judaism? Read the story

The Thread Collectors is a new Civil War-era novel tracing a Jewish couple from New York City and a Black couple from New Orleans as their stories converge. The books co-authors are already dreaming up a sequel.

A 93-year-old Holocaust survivor has become a modern-day Chagall. If I hadnt been able to imagine something else, I would have gone insane, he said at a recent exhibit of his artwork.

Forwarding the News is now also available on our website. Click on the blue button below to share it on social media or send to friends.

WHAT ELSE YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY

The stadium on the campus of the University of Michigan. (iStock)

At least three antisemitic incidents were reported on American college campuses during Rosh Hashanah: The Jewish fraternity at Rutgers was vandalized, with eggs thrown at the house; flyers blaming Jews for COVID were found at the University of Michigan and throughout Ann Arbor; and, at American University, a swastika was found on the ceiling of a dorm bathroom. (Jerusalem Post, The Eagle, WXYZ)

An estimated 23,000 Jewish pilgrims participated in Rosh Hashanah services in Uman, Ukraine, the site of the tomb of the Hasidic leader Rabbi Nachman, amid blaring air raid sirens. Even if Uman was in Iran, we would be going, said one pilgrim. (Haaretz)

The Jerusalem Post unveiled its 50 most influential Jews of 2022. Ukrainian President Volodomyr Zelenskyy topped the list, which was filled with the usual suspects of politicians, rabbis and philanthropists and an astronaut! (Jerusalem Post)

Why does an Episcopal church in an Alaska town have a prominent Star of David window? Its a mystery that has endured for more than 120 years. One theory according to a local Jewish leader: Some shlemiel in the shipping department must have got the windows crossed. (JTA)

Were getting a Hallmark Hanukkah romantic comedy about feuding deli owners this December. The movie which stars Broadway actor Jeremy Jordan, Yael Grobglas from Jane the Virgin, and rocker Lisa Loeb began filming this week in Canada. (Kveller)

Shiva calls Albert Kamoo, one of the last five Jews in Damascus, died at 80 Irwin Glusker, an art designer of magazines and books whose work became a fixture in dens across the United States, died at 98. Gluskers wife, Lilyan, died one month earlier.

What else were reading Seattle woman knighted for helping Sephardic Jews become Spanish citizens The rise of Angel City FC, National Womens Soccer League team in Los Angeles co-founded by Natalie Portman Israel youth soccer squad defeats Ireland to win spot in European championships.

Was this newsletter forwarded to you or are you reading it on our website? Receive it in your inbox each morning by clicking the blue button below.

Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres and Yitzhak Rabin receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1994. (Wikimedia)

On this day in history (2016): Shimon Peres, the elder statesman who served as both prime minister and president of Israel, died. Peres was known for his advocacy of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, primarily his work on the Oslo Peace Accords as Israels foreign minister in the 1990s. I dont regret any of my dreams, Peres wrote in his final book. My only regret is not having dreamed more. Read our appreciation of Peres

Last year on this day, with the release of The Many Saints of Newark, we explored the secret Jewish history of The Sopranos.

On the Hebrew calendar, its the third of Tishrei, the day in 423 BCE when Gedaliah ben Achikam, governor of the land of Israel, was assassinated. It is marked as one of the four minor sunup to sundown fasts on the Jewish calendar, called Tzom Gedaliah (the Fast of Gedaliah).

In honor of National Drink Beer Day (well, not if youre fasting; see above), watch our 2021 conversation with Jeremy Cowan, the founder of HeBrew Beer, about the lessons he learned after make The Chosen Ale for 25 years.

Ever wanted to take a peek into an artists process? Our PJ Grisar and Nora Berman paid a visit to Tobi Kahns New York studio, where he showed them his famous Omer Counter, his new paintings and even his first Torah ark. Watch the video tour above and then register here to join an upcoming conversation with Kahn and Talya Zax, our innovation editor.

Play todays Vertl puzzle, the Yiddish Wordle

Thanks to Jordan Greene, PJ Grisar, Jacob Kornbluh and Talya Zax for contributing to todays newsletter. You can reach the Forwarding team at [emailprotected].

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Campuses hit by antisemitism on Rosh Hashanah + Is this Broadways most Jewish play? - Forward

Voluntary dues afford us a better Jewish new year – eJewish Philanthropy

Posted By on September 29, 2022

Since their founding in our country more than three centuries ago, synagogues have served as the mainstays of Jewish life, welcoming and helping generations of Jewish immigrants acculturate and articulate uniquely Jewish and American identities. But for far too long, many Jewish congregations have utilized a model of set dues that members need to pay for access. While most congregations express a value of welcome, set dues can create a financial barrier and shift the focus away from deep communal relationship.

Its time to invert the model giving much and empowering and welcoming even more. Our community just became the first Reform congregation in Manhattan to align its fundraising with its values. We now empower our members to give to their hearts content, but without a formal mandate or fixed level. Our voluntary dues (community commitment) membership is poised to transform not only our presence externally, but how we relate internally.

Courtesy of Hannah Stampleman / East End Temple

East End Temple is blessed to be among the few synagogues and even fewer in major urban areas to emerge larger and more vibrant than we were in March 2020. What became evident during our time physically apart or in varying stages of hybrid togetherness was that lay-led programs engaged the most people in the most soulful ways.

We have a Shabbat schmooze at 1 pm on Saturday afternoons that brings together dozens of people in deep, soulful (or silly) conversations. We have a Monday minyan that popped up on Zoom and gives people solace after years of atypical losses. Our chesed (caring community) group backs up our clergy and ensures that hundreds of people receive calls, cards, and care. Our congregation helped set up apartments for refugee families, protest injustice and advocate for civil rights. Lay people shared of their talents, abilities and wisdom. Simply put, when needs became overwhelming, our congregation rose to the occasion.

With so much shifting to lay leadership, in intentional collaboration with our clergy, it no longer made sense to use a top-down funding approach of fixed dues. We have trusted our community members with key functions as never before. We can trust them to care for our community financially, as well.

Three years ago, we began a pilot program of voluntary dues for new members. That experiment with new members has shown that empowerment drives both growth in numbers and growth in giving. It yielded more in total donations and per adult than did the prior system of fixed dues. Moreover, because our recent growth rate has been so strong, new members from the past three years now represent 38% of our total congregation.

At our annual meeting this past June, our community voted overwhelmingly to affirm a transition entirely to a voluntary dues system, which we call Community Commitment. Our members are not passive recipients of services, but co-creators of community, front and center in all that we do and how we build. They affirmed that they will, voluntarily, also ensure our financial viability and strength to the future.

As a 75-year-old community, we know what it is to weather the unrest in society. Looking back, it started with the families who settled in our part of Manhattan after World War II, who gathered to form a new community. Those same lay people led social gatherings bringing people together after the trauma of war and global unrest. Yes, they hired clergy to support and empower them, but they never gave up an ethos of lay leadership.

As we continue forward in the Jewish New Year, we reaffirm this focus. Communal leadership is not simply part of our past, but an inevitable part of our future. For us at East End Temple, voluntary dues are the best way to financially reflect the values ethic of empowerment. We are a community of volunteers. We are a community of voluntary dues.

Brian Lifsec and Rebecca Shore are co-presidents of East End Temple. Joshua Stanton is rabbi of East End Temple and director of leadership at CLAL The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership.

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Voluntary dues afford us a better Jewish new year - eJewish Philanthropy

Jews. In Their Own Words review appalling revelations in a gallop through centuries of bigotry – The Guardian

Posted By on September 29, 2022

This verbatim drama about antisemitism was, ironically, born out of an instance of antisemitism in the theatre now staging it, and it opens with a reference to that episode. A man emerges out of a crackle of light, invoking the birth of humankind, to be told he is Hershel Fink, the accidentally Jewish-sounding name initially given to the avaricious billionaire in the play Rare Earth Mettle, produced at the Royal Court in 2021.

Based on an idea by the actor Tracy-Ann Oberman and written by the Guardian journalist Jonathan Freedland, the play aims to examine antisemitism inside liberal institutions such as this venue and more emphatically the political left that draw themselves as the enlightened, anti-racist good guys but harbour unconscious bigotries.

It is a playful start to a production, directed by Vicky Featherstone and Audrey Sheffield, that comes with bold theatricality, songs and wry jokes, albeit underpinned by deadly serious inquiry into how it is that this most ancient form of hate still persists. Jews takes us from that opening riff across centuries of prejudice and persecution, as comprehensively as is possible in under two hours. Freedland has put in diligent research: 180,000 words drawn from interviews and 12 voices that range from eminent Jewish figures Margaret Hodge, Howard Jacobson and Oberman among them to everyday members of British society whose accounts are just as powerful, and all of whom are played by seven nimbly alternating actors.

It brings a welter of important, appalling and too-often ignored realities, experiences, arguments, to the stage, but ends up as rather a gallop across centuries of terrain, packing in too much without unpacking it fully enough and touching so many bases that some parts risk sounding like soundbites.

Its theatricality does not always land and feels as if it is trying too hard to give the verbatim form a dramatic edge, enacting medieval mystery style mimes while characters recount the origins of antisemitic tropes, from the myth of the moneylending Jew to the lurid fantasy of blood libel (which ties Jewish ritual with the blood of non-Jewish children).

The play gains in power when this is dropped for a plainer, stiller form of storytelling, around a table, one character speaking after another of a swastika being etched into their family car, of growing up in Iraq and listening to radio dramas with offensive Jewish stereotypes, of casual but heinous abuse in schools, taxicabs, offices. These are more distilled moments, filled with potency, and we wish for less so that we can have more, with one argument or experience given its fuller due.

The plays larger framework somewhat undercuts its central purpose to focus on leftwing antisemitism too. It shows us just how ubiquitous this form of racial bigotry is, way beyond party politics, although we certainly get alarming accounts from Hodge (played by Debbie Chazen) and former Labour shadow minister, Luciana Berger (Louisa Clein) about the inaction and obfuscation they experienced, along with vile intersections between misogyny and antisemitism on social media.

But the drama much more compellingly shows how antisemitism pervades across culture, history and is embedded in language itself. Stephen Bush (Billy Ashcroft) makes a valuable point about the liberal lefts characteristic suspicion of money and power a loaded association given long-held antisemitic conspiracy theories around Jews running the media and holding all wealth and power. Other anti-left arguments sound more generalising though: that the left supports the underdog and so stopped supporting Israel after Israels victory in the 1967 war (The sentimental left cannot sympathise with anyone who wins). The Guardian, it is suggested, is guilty of the same.

Bush points out too how the left does not imagine Jews to be Black and it is unfortunate, in light of that statement, that there are limited insights into being a Black Jewish Briton here Bush is the only character of mixed heritage, though there is the story of one Iraqi refugee, Edwin Shuker (Hemi Yeroham).

There is an immensely powerful but all too brief look at inherited trauma and the legacy of the Holocaust, with mournful stories of packed suitcases left by the door decades after the second world war and a paediatrician who speaks of having a portable career in case she has to flee, which is utterly heartbreaking.

It introduces Israel as a subject but eschews it too. Whats a foreign conflict got to do with me? says one character and others speak about how they are constantly being called upon for their opinions on the Middle East conflict. The play resuscitates an old charge against Caryl Churchills contentious 2009 play, Seven Jewish Children, written shortly after Israels bombing of Gaza (which killed more than 200 Palestinian children). Jacobson (Steve Furst) remembers seeing it and feeling as if the audience was being encouraged to boo the Jews. We hear how the play invokes myths around blood libel, as well as conflating the term Jewish with Israeli (Churchill and her plays director, Dominic Cooke, have robustly defended the play against these charges).

Criticise what you want the prime minister, the settlements policy, this war, this military strategy, says one character. Most Jews would agree with you. But dont do it in a way which criticises the Jewishness of Israel. The opacity of this statement begs more discussion which we do not get, along with tentative statements on the intersection between antisemitism and anti-Zionism which leaves the discussion dangling. Instead, the drama steps away from exploring how protest and pro-Palestinian sympathies can legitimately be expressed by Jewish voices in public, and art, which was, according to Cooke, the point of his play.

Ultimately, its probing intentions are there but its remit is simply too large, powering on to the next subject and then the next. But there is, even in this, a sense of a bigger, valid, anxiety: this feels like a play that is being given a rare chance to air its urgent and desperately important issues, making it feverish to cover all the ground in the time it has been afforded.

At the Jerwood Theatre Downstairs, Royal Court, London until 22 October.

Originally posted here:

Jews. In Their Own Words review appalling revelations in a gallop through centuries of bigotry - The Guardian

Museum Of Jewish Heritage A Living Memorial To The Holocaust Presents THE NEW YORK JEWISH BOOK FESTIVAL This December – Broadway World

Posted By on September 29, 2022

The Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust will present the inaugural New York Jewish Book Festival this December featuring talks, panels, and author signings. The daylong event - on Sunday, December 11, 2022 beginning at 10:00 AM - will touch on themes of Jewish heritage including culture and history, modern life and literature, the Holocaust, food and cookbooks, and books for kids and families.

The New York Jewish Book Festival is free to the public and there will be books for sale in the Museum's Pickman Gift Shop and by individual authors and invited organizations, just in time for the winter holidays. Among the highlights in store will be a panel of well-known photographers discussing their work photographing Holocaust survivors, and a new biography of businessman and philanthropist Edmond J. Safra, after whom the Museum's theater is named.

Keynotes will feature illustrator and author Maira Kalman on her new book, Women Holding Things; Gary Shteyngart, author of Our Country Friends; and a conversation with the famed culinary historian and author Michael Twitty, the Southern Jewish television personality, blogger, and author of Koshersoul.

More details about the event - which will run from 10 AM to 9 PM - will be released this fall.

For more information and to register, visit http://nyjewishbookfestival.org

Festival attendees can nosh at the acclaimed LOX Caf, visit Andy Goldsworthy's Garden of Stones, and visit two inspiring and moving exhibitions.

The Museum's main exhibition, The Holocaust: What Hate Can Do is an expansive and timely presentation of Holocaust history told through personal stories, objects, photos, and film - many on view for the first time. The 12,000-square-foot exhibition features over 750 original objects and survivor testimonies from the Museum's collection. The Holocaust: What Hate Can Do is a representation of this global story through a local lens, rooted in the objects donated by survivors and their families, many of whom settled in New York and nearby places.

Also now on view is Survivors: Faces of Life After the Holocaust. Photographs by Martin Schoeller, the inaugural exhibition in the Rita Lowenstein Gallery. This exhibition, originated by Martin Schoeller and Yad Vashem, features 75 photographs created to mark the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz. Schoeller photographed these Holocaust survivors and created a short film documenting the process. The exhibition includes the entire body of work including the film, bios, and quotes from the sitters.

For more information or to purchase tickets, click here.

$18 Adults

$12 ADA/Access, Seniors, Students, Veterans

FREE to children under 12 and NYC DOE K-12 students

FREE to Holocaust Survivors, active members of the military, educators with current ID cards, and first responders

For more detailed information on the Museum's safety protocols and requirements, visit: https://mjhnyc.org/visitor-information/health-and-safety/

Celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2022, the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is New York's contribution to the global responsibility to always remember. The Museum is committed to the crucial mission of educating diverse visitors about Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The third-largest Holocaust museum in the world and the second-largest in North America, the Museum of Jewish Heritage anchors the southernmost tip of Manhattan, completing the cultural and educational landscape it shares with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage maintains a collection of almost 40,000 artifacts, photographs, documentary films, and survivor testimonies and contains classrooms, a 375-seat theater (Edmond J. Safra Hall), special exhibition galleries, a resource center for educators, and a memorial art installation, Garden of Stones, designed by internationally acclaimed sculptor Andy Goldsworthy. The Museum is the home of National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene and JewishGen.

The Museum's current offerings include The Holocaust: What Hate Can Do, a major new exhibition offering a timely and expansive presentation of Holocaust history, now on view in the main galleries. Also on view is Boris Lurie: Nothing To Do But To Try, a first of its kind exhibition on the 20th century artist and Holocaust survivor on view through November 6, 2022, and Survivors: Faces of Life After the Holocaust, featuring photographer Martin Schoeller's portraits of Holocaust survivors on view through June 18, 2023.

Each year, the Museum presents over 60 public programs, connecting our community in person and virtually through lectures, book talks, concerts, and more. For more info visit: mjhnyc.org/events.

The Museum receives general operating support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts.

For more information, visit mjhnyc.org.

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Museum Of Jewish Heritage A Living Memorial To The Holocaust Presents THE NEW YORK JEWISH BOOK FESTIVAL This December - Broadway World

The significance of Rosh Hashanah for the Jewish community – ABC Action News Tampa Bay

Posted By on September 29, 2022

TAMPA, Fla.Tuesday is the last day of Rosh Hashanah. Rabbi Mendy with the Chabad House in South Tampa explained what is the significance of this Jewish holiday.

Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish new year, but the literal translation of Rosh Hashanah is head of the year and the reason why we call it the beginning of the new year the head of the year, is that just like a head orchestrates and controls the functions of the body, so, too, these two days set the tone and the path for the coming year, said Rabbi Mendy.

He said Rosh Hashanah is a time for Jewish people to reflect on their successes and areas where they fell short in the previous year. And we set the path for the coming year. Resolutions, things we want to accomplish and achieve and we ask God to grant us good health, blessings so that we can achieve and fulfill our mission for the coming year, said Rabbi Mendy.

Rosh Hashanah started Sunday evening and ends on Tuesday evening. During these days, Jewish people celebrate with prayer, food and blowing a traditional horn called the shofar.

I asked Rabbi Mendy what he wanted to improve upon in the new year. My goal this year is to be joyful in whatever it is that Im doing and to be intentional about it, to lean into it. Sometimes, were involved in big, exciting activities we get enthusiastic about, were going on trips and were spending time with our families and its wonderful, but then theres the minutia of life, the every day that can sometimes deplete us of and drain us of our energy.

From all of us at ABC Action New, Happy Rosh Hashana!

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The significance of Rosh Hashanah for the Jewish community - ABC Action News Tampa Bay

Coming events, October 2022 – The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle

Posted By on September 29, 2022

Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022

Family Fun Day

Family Fun Day (ages 2-5), at the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center, 6255 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Whitefish Bay. It will include a ninja obstacle course and sukkah decorating. $8 members/$10 community, per family. Oct. 2, 11-1 p.m.

Israeli archeologist

The Milwaukee Area Biblical Archaeology Society is hosting a Zoom lecture by Dr. Adi Ehrlich, University of Haifa. Erlich is the head of the Zinman Institute of Archaeology and a professor of archaeology and art history at the University of Haifa. The talk, The Keys of the Kingdom of Heaven: New Discoveries from Paneas (Caesarea Philippi), Israel, is set for Oct. 2, 1:30 p.m. in an online Zoom presentation from Israel (https://zoom.us/j/97115332855). MABAS will also host viewing in the Reichel Lecture Hall, FM15, Wisconsin Lutheran College. The lecture will also be recorded and made available on the MABAS Vimeo Showcase. For information, contact Glen Thompson at glen.thompson@wlc.edu.

Friendship Circle teens

Teen Volunteer Kickoff with Friendship Circle. Enjoy a movie night under the stars with the Friendship Circle volunteers to kick off the year. Plus, learn what volunteering is all about. The Steins Backyard, 9230 N. Fairway Dr., Bayside. Oct. 2, 5-7 p.m.

Monday, Oct. 3

Israeli Folk Dancing

Learn and dance the latest Israeli circle dances on Monday evenings at the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center, 6255 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Whitefish Bay. Participants usually start with a few beginner/easier dances and then transition to more advanced dances as the evening progresses. Please be aware that the JCC is no longer offering the Israeli dance program free of charge. If you want to drop in to try a class, there is a $15 drop-in charge per class. If you decide to join the class on a more permanent basis, you can purchase a Community Membership for $180 per year. With this membership, you get 12 months of membership for all exercise classes at the JCC, meaning you pay the member price for any class you wish to take. The Israeli dance class is free to all members. Because we are dancing indoors in an unventilated space, it is required that all dancers be fully vaccinated to reduce the risk of COVID exposure to all participants. If you are not vaccinated and would still like to participate, you must wear a mask at all times while in the dance studio and maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from other dancers. For more information, contact MilwaukeeIFD@yahoo.com.

Tuesday, Oct. 4

Erev Yom Kippur

May you be inscribed into the Book of Life!

Friday, Oct. 7

Memory loss club

ReCharge and Renew Club. This social club offers active individuals experiencing memory loss at an early age opportunities to participate in a variety of cultural events and interactive experiences. The program seeks to improve quality of life through meaningful social connections and community outings. It is the first model program in Wisconsin to serve individuals under the age of 65. Relax with coffee, overlooking beautiful Lake Michigan in the Rubenstein Family Kosher Oasis and art gallery. Participate in a Specialized Supportive Wellness Group. Learn stress and relaxation techniques. Engage in community outings, the Jewish Museum Milwaukees SPARK! program and participate in a support group. The R&R Club meets virtually. For more information and to receive Zoom link, contact Dawn Adler, DAdler@ovation.org or 414-277-8838. Oct. 7, 10-11:30 a.m.

Sunday, Oct. 9

Erev Sukkot

Chag Sameach!

Thursday, Oct 13

Pianist Mona Golabek

The Children of Willesden Lane, performed by Mona Golabek. Join Tapestry for a one-woman performance by concert pianist Mona Golabek that recounts the story of her mother, Lisa Jura, a child piano prodigy born in Vienna, Austria, who came to England as a refugee in 1938 as part of the Kindertransport rescue operation and settled in a Jewish hostel on Willesden Lane. Deeply inspired by her mothers story, Lisas daughter, concert pianist Mona Golabek, travels the globe sharing the story of her mothers courage, passion and resilience. Sponsored by the Libby Temkin Endowment for the Arts and by the Nathan and Esther Pelz Holocaust Education Resource Center. Oct. 13, 7 p.m. at the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center, 6255 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Whitefish Bay. Purchase tickets at jccmilwaukee.org/performance. Member $24 / Community $30.

Sukkah Fest

Peltz Center for Jewish Lifes Grand Sukkah Fest Experience. The Grand Sukkah Fest Experience for children, teens and adults. BBQ chicken dinner, hot dogs, cotton candy, popcorn, face painting, moon bounce, super slide, gladiator joust, pop-a-shot, special toddler activity center, and more. Bring the entire family to the biggest Sukkah in the county. Oct. 13, from 4-7 p.m.

Thursday, Oct. 20

Jews of Cinema

Back to the Sources: The Jews of Cinema, by Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center. Instructor: Jody Hirsh. Who created Jewish movies and why? How do these film representations change the way we see ourselves? Delve into groundbreaking Jewish cinema during this six-week session. For each class, it is recommended that you watch the film in advance for the discussion. Thursdays, Oct. 20-Dec. 1. No class Nov. 24. 10 a.m. Questions? Contact JCC Arts & Culture Director Reva Fox at RFox@jccmilwaukee.org or call 414-967-8212.

Domestic Violence support

Domestic Violence Survivors In Person Support Group, by Jewish Family Services. Jewish Family Services has been helping individuals who are experiencing intimate partner violence in our community for five years through a collaboration with Sojourner Family Peace Center. They are now offering a virtual educational/support group for women within the Jewish community who want to understand and get support in their own healing journey. This support group is hosted in-person. The location and attendees are confidential. These groups will be led by experts in the dynamics of unhealthy relationships. To RSVP contact Kat Blackwell at 414-225-1374 or email Clinic@Ffsmilw.org. Oct. 20, 10 a.m.

Friday, Oct. 21

Challah and Community

Partnering with PJ Library, the organization that provides free Jewish childrens books, join the JCC for challah braiding and shabbat songs/books. Free and open to the community. Oct. 21, 10-10:30 a.m. at the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center, 6255 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Whitefish Bay.

Sunday, Oct. 23

Join Congregation Beth Israel Ner Tamid Sisterhood on Oct. 23, for a Divas Day Out Fall Boutique and Vendor Fair. Open 10 a.m.- 3 p.m., this is the perfect opportunity to start your holiday shopping. With up to 50 vendors, this is free to enter and open to the public. For more information contact the synagogue at 414-352-7310.

Thursday, Oct. 27

Kohler Art Preserve Tour

By Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center. The Art Preserve is the worlds first museum to focus entirely on work from art environments. Opened in 2021 by the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, the Art Preserve holds over 25,000 works in its collection. Join Tapestry for a docent-led tour with unprecedented access and insight into the display, preservation, conservation and interpretation of the Arts Centers premier collection. Includes lunch. 10 a.m., members $42 and community $50. Contact JCC Arts & Culture Director Reva Fox at RFox@Jccmilwaukee.org or call 414-967-8212. hrs@jccmilwaukee.org. Jccmilwaukee.org.

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Coming events, October 2022 - The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle


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