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The Noahide Laws :: Zionism Exposed

Posted By on December 15, 2022

"With but a few exceptions, the punishment meted out to a Noachid for the transgression of any of the seven laws is decapitation." (1906 Encyclopedia)

What few Christians know and what isn't explicitly stated within the US legislation, is that the first and second Noahide laws, which prohibit idolatry and blasphemy, would be transgressed by all Christians. This is because the worship of Jesus Christ is considered idolatry and the name of Jesus is blasphemy according to the Talmud.

"With regard to idolatry, he can be found guilty only if he worshiped an idol in the regular form in which that particular deity is usually worshiped; while in the case of blasphemy he may be found guilty, even when he has blasphemed with one of the attributes of God's name-an action which, if committed by an Israelite, would not be regarded as criminal (ib. 56b; see Blasphemy)." (1906 Encyclopedia)

Therefore, under the Noahide Laws all Christians will be beheaded.

"And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands; and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years." (Rev 20:4)

Courts will be established everywhere to issue warnings and to exact justice for violations of the Noahide Laws. Some of these courts and even prisons will exist within churches. Few Christians are aware of the inordinate number of church elders today who have police/military backgrounds with some churches even having their own police force. (L)

"The Noachid [those who the Noahide Laws are binding upon] are required to establish courts of justice in every city and province; and these courts are to judge the people with regard to the six laws and to warn them against the transgression of any of them." (1906 Jewish Encyclopedia)

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The Noahide Laws :: Zionism Exposed

Hanukkah merch is hitting the shelves, but does that signify more Jewish representation? – Haaretz

Posted By on December 13, 2022

Hanukkah merch is hitting the shelves, but does that signify more Jewish representation?  Haaretz

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Hanukkah merch is hitting the shelves, but does that signify more Jewish representation? - Haaretz

We wish we were talking about Jewish joy: Rate of antisemitic incidents continue to spike, ADL official says – cleveland.com

Posted By on December 13, 2022

We wish we were talking about Jewish joy: Rate of antisemitic incidents continue to spike, ADL official says  cleveland.com

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We wish we were talking about Jewish joy: Rate of antisemitic incidents continue to spike, ADL official says - cleveland.com

Bakersfields oldest Jewish congregation sells downtown synagogue; developer will raze it and build new high-density housing – KGET 17

Posted By on December 13, 2022

Bakersfields oldest Jewish congregation sells downtown synagogue; developer will raze it and build new high-density housing  KGET 17

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Bakersfields oldest Jewish congregation sells downtown synagogue; developer will raze it and build new high-density housing - KGET 17

Why Is Naftali Bennett Suing This Rabbi for Defamation? – Israel News – Haaretz

Posted By on December 13, 2022

  1. Why Is Naftali Bennett Suing This Rabbi for Defamation? - Israel News  Haaretz
  2. Bennett sues rabbi for spreading false claims his parents were not Jewish  The Times of Israel
  3. Naftali Bennett sues rabbi who claimed ex-PM's mother is not Jewish  The Jewish Chronicle
  4. Bennett demands apology, compensation from Rabbi Yossi Mizrachi  Arutz Sheva
  5. View Full Coverage on Google News

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Why Is Naftali Bennett Suing This Rabbi for Defamation? - Israel News - Haaretz

NJ Synagogue Threat: FBI Says Credible Information Developed NBC New York

Posted By on December 11, 2022

BREAKING UPDATE: FBI Identifies Suspect in NJ Synagogues Threat Case

The FBI's Newark office issued a stark warning Thursday as it announced it had received "credible information" about a nonspecific but widescale threat to synagogues in New Jersey.

The FBI described the threat, shared by the bureau's Newark office on Twitter around 3 p.m., as "broad." However, a senior law enforcement official told News 4 New York that warning the public was done in "an abundance of caution."

"We ask at this time that you take all security precautions to protect your community and facility," FBI Newark tweeted in part. "We shall share more information as soon as we can. Stay alert. In case of emergency call police."

Although there is no specific plot or action underway, according to the source, because the internet threat was deemed credible, the FBI felt it was important to alert the public via social media so communities and synagogues could take security precautions. Synagogues across the state were asked to remain vigilant, and police in some communities were stepping up patrols.

The FBI's investigation is underway to determine who was behind the threat, which was posted online. Numerous law enforcement officials said the alert was issued because of a general threat to New Jersey temples. Officials stressed there was no specific plot nor a specific temple mentioned as a possible target.

Following the FBI's precautionary warning, Gov. Phil Murphy said he is "closely monitoring the situation and working with local law enforcement." New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said she had also been briefed, adding that there was no related threat in New York.

In a statement, the NYPD said the department's intelligence and counterterrorism bureaus were "working diligently alongside the Joint Terrorism Task Force and the FBI to ensure the safety and well-being of every area that encompasses our Jewish citizens and synagogues here in New York City and the tri-state area."

Despite the warning from law enforcement, some law enforcement officials were left scratching their heads as to why this threat was deemed more credible than many others posted every day. But with a major increase in antisemitic incidents, officials in New Jersey said the warning was sent as a reminder for vigilance.

"It was a non-specific threat.We have a system in place for making sure the word is out and that all the players are involved and mobilized.But in that environment you have to be careful," New York/New Jersey Anti-Defamation League Director Scott Richman said of the warning and spike in antisemitic incidents.

The investigation into the threat continues.

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NJ Synagogue Threat: FBI Says Credible Information Developed NBC New York

Video shows man making bigoted remarks at Bloomfield Twp. synagogue – Detroit Free Press

Posted By on December 11, 2022

  1. Video shows man making bigoted remarks at Bloomfield Twp. synagogue  Detroit Free Press
  2. Michigan man charged after threatening synagogue-goers attacks magistrate verbally as well  St. Louis Jewish Light
  3. Man charged with synagogue threats held on $1M bond - flips off judge, makes anti-Semitic remarks  FOX 2 Detroit
  4. Local synagogue leaders on threats after Bloomfield Township weekend arrest: 'It's really stressful'  Detroit News
  5. Dearborn man charged with ethnic intimidation at Bloomfield Township synagogue, preschool  C&G Newspapers
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

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Video shows man making bigoted remarks at Bloomfield Twp. synagogue - Detroit Free Press

Two men, one a descendant of Holocaust survivor, indicted in connection with threat to attack NYC synagogue – CNN

Posted By on December 11, 2022

  1. Two men, one a descendant of Holocaust survivor, indicted in connection with threat to attack NYC synagogue  CNN
  2. Manhattan judge releases man accused of plotting to attack NYC synagogues  New York Post
  3. LI Man Charged With Terroristic Threat For Shoot Up Synagogue Tweet  Riverhead, NY Patch
  4. NYC judge REFUSES to put anti-Semitic thug accused of plotting attacks on synagogues back in jail  Daily Mail
  5. Christopher Brown, Matthew Mahrer appear in court over alleged plan to attack the Jewish community in Manhattan  CBS New York
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

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Two men, one a descendant of Holocaust survivor, indicted in connection with threat to attack NYC synagogue - CNN

Hasidic School Is Breaking State Education Law, N.Y. Official Rules

Posted By on December 11, 2022

New York State officials have determined that a private Hasidic Jewish boys school in Brooklyn is violating the law by failing to provide a basic education, a ruling that could signal profound challenges for scores of Hasidic religious schools that have long resisted government oversight.

The ruling marks the first time that the state has taken action against such a school, one of scores of private Hasidic yeshivas across New York that provide robust religious instruction in Yiddish but few lessons in English and math and virtually none in science, history or social studies.

It also served as a stern rebuke of the administration of Mayor Eric Adams, whose Education Department this summer reported to the state that, in its judgment, the yeshiva was complying with a law requiring private schools to offer an education comparable with what is offered in public schools.

The decision, issued last week by the state education commissioner, Betty Rosa, stemmed from a 2019 lawsuit brought by a parent against the school, Yeshiva Mesivta Arugath Habosem, which enrolls about 500 boys in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

The ruling requires the yeshiva to work with city education officials to come up with an improvement plan. The New York State Education Department will have final say over that plan, putting pressure on city officials who have previously avoided intervening in yeshivas.

A spokesman for the New York City Department of Education said the city conducted a thorough investigation of the school, visiting multiple times, reviewing instructional materials and interviewing staff members.

We stand by our investigation and recognize that our recommendation was just that a recommendation and that the state had ultimate authority to make the determination, said the spokesman, Nathaniel Styer.

The potential ramifications of Ms. Rosas decision extend beyond a single school. The ruling could be a harbinger of significantly tougher oversight of Hasidic yeshivas, and could open the door for lawsuits or complaints about other schools.

The state did right, said Beatrice Weber, a mother of 10 who brought the suit against her youngest childs school and has since left the Hasidic community. Hopefully now things will actually change.

The ruling came a month after the The New York Times reported that more than 100 Hasidic boys schools in Brooklyn and the lower Hudson Valley have collected at least $1 billion in taxpayer money in the past four years, but many have denied students secular instruction.

The Times found that Hasidic boys yeshivas that administer state standardized tests perform worse than any other schools in New York State, and that religion teachers in many of the schools have frequently used corporal punishment to enforce order, hindering learning.

Ms. Rosas decision will also provide the first test of a new set of state rules aimed at regulating private schools, which have largely been allowed to operate without oversight for decades. Those regulations, which went into effect two weeks ago, hold that schools that do not follow state law could lose their public funding.

Hasidic leaders fought to block the new rules before they were approved by the State Board of Regents last month, casting them as a dire threat to the community. Earlier this week, a group of yeshivas and their supporters sued New York education officials over the rules in state court. Many of the plaintiffs in the suit were non-Hasidic yeshivas that provide extensive secular education and would likely not be affected by the regulations.

Yeshivas are the central and irreplaceable pillar of the Orthodox Jewish life in New York, reads the lawsuit, which seeks to have the regulations overturned.

On Wednesday, a spokesman for one of the groups that filed the lawsuit, the Parents for Educational and Religious Liberty in Schools, defended Yeshiva Mesivta Arugath Habosem.

Educators from the citys Department of Education visited the school several times and determined that it met the substantial equivalence standard, said the spokesman, Richard Bamberger, referring to the state law. It is disappointing that political appointees at the state education department wont accept the citys findings.

In her ruling, Ms. Rosa sharply criticized the citys oversight of the school, saying that its own inspections of the yeshiva did not support its conclusion that the school was providing an adequate education.

She said that observations she received from city officials in fact indicated that the yeshiva does not offer sufficient instruction in English, social studies or science. The schools math instruction appeared to be better but was still not on par with what is offered in public schools, Ms. Rosa said. The commissioner wrote that the yeshiva administers state tests in English and math, but she added that the vast majority of its students failed the exams and scored much lower than the average student in city public schools.

The commissioner wrote that she found shortcomings in the citys review, including an apparent failure by officials to investigate the specific claims detailed in Ms. Webers lawsuit. Ms. Rosa said the deficiencies in the review did not promote confidence in the findings.

The commissioner also wrote that the school declined to allow a visit that state education department officials requested last month and repeatedly declined to provide evidence that it was complying with state education law, even after Ms. Rosa warned that there was insufficient proof that the school was in compliance.

Beyond finding fault with the citys inspection of the Brooklyn school, the ruling also raises questions about City Halls willingness to intervene in Hasidic schools. Mr. Adams has long enjoyed the political support of the Hasidic Jewish community, which tends to vote as a bloc.

In response to the Times investigation, he said that his administration would complete an inquiry into dozens of schools that was started under former mayor Bill de Blasio in 2015 but was put on hold amid the pandemic. In 2019, an interim report found that only two of 28 Hasidic yeshivas the city had visited were complying with state education law.

Mr. Adams is not the only New York politician who has sought to avoid criticizing Hasidic yeshivas. Gov. Kathy Hochul, who took over after her predecessor, Andrew M. Cuomo resigned, is facing her first general election as governor next month, and has deflected questions about the schools.

People understand that this is outside the purview of the governor, Ms. Hochul said last month when asked about the Times investigation into Hasidic yeshivas.

The governor was endorsed by Hasidic groups ahead of the Democratic primary this summer, and one group wrote on Twitter that the governor had promised a hands-off approach to the yeshivas in a post that was deleted soon after.

Many Hasidic groups have not yet endorsed a candidate in the general election. Representative Lee Zeldin, the Republican candidate for governor, has sought to capitalize on the Hasidic communitys outrage over increased government oversight into the yeshivas.

Some Hasidic leaders have openly declared that they would never change how their schools operate.

Ms. Webers 2019 lawsuit against her sons yeshiva represented a major challenge to the Hasidic community.

The school at the center of her complaint, Yeshiva Mesivta Arugath Habosem, is a longstanding institution in the community with a reputation for providing more secular education than many other Hasidic boys schools.

Nevertheless, a Times analysis of state test score data available for three grades at the school showed that while 122 students took reading and math exams in 2019, just one of them passed.

Records obtained by The Times showed that the school received about $4.5 million in government funding in the last full year before the pandemic.

In her complaint, Ms. Weber alleged that her then-6-year-old son, Aaron, had yet to receive any secular education. She also said that materials from the school indicated that students who received English-language instruction only got it for about 90 minutes a day, four days a week.

Ms. Weber filed a petition with the state education department asking Ms. Rosa to intervene. The commissioner dismissed the petition in 2021, citing a lack of jurisdiction. But Ms. Weber successfully challenged that decision in state court, securing a judges order that the state issue a final determination on her sons school.

As the state prepared to make its ruling, city officials filed their required recommendation in July. In saying they believed the school was complying with the law, officials said they had observed English-language instruction, including in social studies, on topics like time zones and the U.S. Postal Service, and in science, on subjects like hurricanes and satellites, according to a copy of their report obtained by The Times.

That is more instruction in those areas than is typically provided in Hasidic boys schools, records and interviews show.

City officials also said in the report that the schools Judaic studies curriculum taught additional key skills.

David Shapiro, a lawyer for Ms. Weber, said the ruling from Ms. Rosa was especially notable because it countered the notion that private schools could claim to be satisfying state secular education requirements through religious instruction.

No longer can a Hasidic yeshiva use its Jewish studies program to argue that through such parochial studies it is complying with the states education law, Mr. Shapiro said, adding: This is an historic, brave and correct determination.

Ms. Weber, who was recently named executive director of Young Advocates for Fair Education, a group that has pushed for more secular education in Hasidic yeshivas, has spent years sounding alarms about deficiencies in Hasidic boys schools.

On at least one occasion, she showed up at the school to observe classroom instruction, but said she was asked to leave the building after 45 minutes.

Her filings also cited letters written by the rabbi in charge of the schools English department that displayed an apparent lack of fluency in English.

Bus changes can only be made in the office of Transpiration, the rabbi wrote in a 2019 letter. Elsewhere, he added: Any misbehavior will be dealt with in a firm manor.

Alex Lemonides contributed reporting.

Originally posted here:

Hasidic School Is Breaking State Education Law, N.Y. Official Rules

Zeldin Sees a Path to Becoming Governor. It Runs Through Brooklyn.

Posted By on December 11, 2022

As for Mr. Zeldins outreach: Its a little late.

Democrats are making their own large investments in many of the same communities, along with more reliable segments of the partys base that could offset Mr. Zeldins gains.

Ms. Hochuls campaign said it would spend six figures on ads aimed at Jewish voters and another $1 million on Spanish-language ads. Many will tout her work on gun control and mental health while hammering Mr. Zeldin for opposing abortion rights and supporting Mr. Trump, who remains broadly unpopular here.

Despite Mr. Zeldins optimism about Orthodox Jewish groups, some estimates suggest that the Hasidic vote typically represents less than 2 percent of statewide turnout, while other religious Jewish groups, including the modern Orthodox, account for another 2 to 3 percent. And Ms. Hochul, who made a series of cold calls last week seeking to shore up ties with prominent Jewish allies, is still expected to win Jewish voters overall, running up the score among non-Orthodox voters.

From Borough Park to the South Bronx, Governor Hochul has built a broad coalition of New Yorkers who are supporting her campaign because of her effective leadership and ability to get things done, said a Hochul spokesman, Jerrel Harvey.

Still, Mr. Zeldin may have good reason to think he can notch gains.

In southern Brooklyn, Russian and Ukrainian immigrants many of them Jewish helped flip a City Council seat for Republicans last year. The large population of immigrants who fled the former Soviet Union voted enthusiastically for Mr. Trump and have increasingly rejected Democrats even moderates like Mayor Eric Adams and Ms. Hochul for their ties to a party that harbors a small minority of democratic socialists.

Even if its a centrist Democrat, they will select a Republican at this point, said Inna Vernikov, a Democrat-turned-Republican who won the Council seat.

Republicans also believe opposition to the states new congestion pricing plan, which would make commuting into Manhattan more expensive for middle-class New Yorkers at a time of sharp inflation, could help motivate turnout.

Continued here:

Zeldin Sees a Path to Becoming Governor. It Runs Through Brooklyn.


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